2021 NFL Draft Big Board

The 2021 NFL Draft should look and feel a lot more normal this year, but with no NFL combine this year, there will be a lot more uncertainty among later-round selections. Here is the Official Joshbobdotcom Top 100 Prospects and specialist rankings for the 2021 NFL Draft.

1. Trevor Lawrence, QB, Clemson (JR, 6′ 5″, 213 pounds)
Lawrence has all the tools to be the best QB in the NFL for the next two decades. His throwing mechanics are polished, he’s tall, he carries himself extremely well off the field, and he’s very athletic. Lawrence is built to fit into a modern NFL offense with his ability to run the football when needed. He’ll need to add more weight to his 6’5” frame, but he’s week 1 ready as a rookie. He’s the closest thing to a sure thing since Peyton Manning entered the draft. 

2. Zach Wilson, QB, BYU (JR, 6′ 2″, 214 pounds)
Wilson is a prospect that would’ve been overlooked a decade ago, but he’s entering the NFL at the right time. He’s a plus athlete with great elusiveness, but not built to be a regular runner. In addition, despite his smaller frame he can sling it with force and on the move. He can make all the throws Lawrence can, but does so from various arm angles to make up for his lack of height when he stays in the pocket. He can get happy feet and left the pocket prematurely a lot at BYU behind one of the best lines in the country. He’ll have to adjust to an NFL pass rush and learn to stay more disciplined in the pocket at the next level, but all the tools are there to be a franchise quarterback. 

3. Kyle Pitts, TE, Florida (Jr, 6′ 5″, 245 pounds)
Pitts is a freak. He’s massive, but ran a 4.4 40-yard dash. He’s the best pass catcher in this draft. He’s quick and twitchy in addition to having elite straight-line speed. He’s in the same mold of a Travis Kelcee, but might even be a better athlete. If not accounting for positional value, he’d be my clear #1 player in this draft. Assuming he stays healthy, he’s a future All-Pro and would be the front-runner of OROY if QBs weren’t eligible.  

4. Micah Parsons, LB, Penn State (Jr, 6′ 3″, 246 pounds)
Parsons is a phenomenal athlete that moves incredibly well for his size. He’s got a frame that can add additional weight at the next level. Parsons shows great instincts and is a true three down linebacker. Parsons has the ability to drop into coverage and can run with modern NFL tight ends. Parsons needs to improve his technique to shed blocks and can occasionally get tunnel vision and lose track of his assignments, but he has all the traits of a future All-Pro.         

5. Ja’Marr Chase, WR, LSU (Jr, 6′ 0″, 201 pounds)
Ja’Marr Chase is a physical freak. While he’s not the tallest receiver, he plays bigger than his 6’0” listing and has filled out nicely, with room for more weight. He’s also extremely young just turning 21 in March. He opted out of his finals season so only has two full seasons to his credit as a college player, but he won the Biletnikoff as a true sophomore amongst a loaded LSU receiving core. Chase runs extremely well and has great body control. OBJ feels like a fair comparison given Chase’s talent and upside with his plus athleticism. 

6. Trey Lance, QB, NDSU (R-Soph, 6′ 3″, 224 pounds)
Lance played one college football game this season after the FCS opted to play a spring season. He played one full season for NDSU leading the Bison to an undefeated season and national title as a RS-Freshman. He played in NDSU’s lone fall game of 2020, a win over Central Arkansas. I like Lance a lot, but he’s a major project and can’t start week 1 in 2021. He needs a year or two to sit and learn while refining his mechanics. His downfield accuracy needs work and he drops his arm lower than I’d like for his release. He is far and away the best running threat of this year’s quarterbacks. The reality is Lance is a boom-or-bust prospect depending on where he lands. He has the tools to be the second-best quarterback in this draft behind Lawrence, but if he’s named a day-1 starter on a bad team, things could go sideways with him. He reminds me a lot of Lamar Jackson where he’ll need the right scheme to thrive. 

7. Penei Sewell, OT, Oregon (Jr, 6′ 4″, 331 pounds)
Sewell stands alone in a deep and talented class of offensive tackle prospects. Sewell is already at his ideal NFL playing size and plays with tremendous athleticism. Within Oregon’s offense he was asked to do a lot with his feet to get into space, but also has great technique in pass protection. His drop step is smooth and he plays with good balance. He doesn’t have the long arms you’d like from a tackle, but he’s mobile enough to stay at tackle and thrive as he gains a better understanding of his angles, timing, and leverage.  

8. Patrick Surtain II, CB, Alabama (Jr, 6′ 2″, 208 pounds)
Surtain runs extremely well and has prototypical size for a shutdown NFL cornerback. Surtain is not an explosive athlete, but makes up for it with his technique and understanding of the game. He is always in the right spot and anticipates routes before they break. Surtain is smooth in coverage and enjoys the physicality of press-man coverage. He’s a day one starter with Pro Bowl potential.         

9. Justin Fields, QB, Ohio State (Jr, 6′ 2″, 227 pounds)
Fields is a gamer. His biggest flaw is that he played in such a collegiate system that he’ll have to adjust his approach at the NFL level. Very rarely did he need to fit throws in tight windows. More often than not he was hitting guys open by five yards. His deep ball accuracy is really impressive and his arm talent is a major plus. He’s a solid runner and tough enough to withstand big hits despite his slight frame. He’s got a body that should be able to add 20-30 more pounds during his career. He’s got a lot of similarities to Deshaun Watson. I just haven’t seen him need to make many NFL throws because his weapons were that good at Ohio State. The struggles against Northwestern were real and should be a cause for concern, but he’s got enough tools to become a franchise quarterback. 

10. Greg Newsome II, CB, Northwestern (Jr, 6′ 0″, 192 pounds)
Newsome was the shutdown corner in an elite Northwestern secondary. He’s the fastest of the elite cornerback prospects. Newsome wasn’t asked to play much press-man coverage in college.  He’s skinnier than I’d like and will need to put on weight to handle the rigors of an NFL schedule. Newsome is ready to start in the NFL and can be a tremendous playmaker with his instincts and ability to read routes as they happen.         

11. Jaelan Phillips, Edge, Miami (FL) (R-Jr, 6′ 5″, 260 pounds)
Phillips jumps out on tape because of his big frame and athleticism. After transferring from UCLA, he broke out in his one season on the field with Miami leading the tram with 15.5 TFL and 8.0 sacks. He suffered several concussions at UCLA and was never cleared to return by UCLA’s doctors leading to his transfer. His medical evaluations might remove him from some draft boards, but in terms of on-field production and physical upside he’s the most NFL ready prospect. 

12. Devonta Smith, WR, Alabama (Sr, 6′ 0″, 170 pounds)
The only problem with Devonta Smith as an NFL prospect is he’s skinny. He’ll need to add a lot of weight during his NFL career and I don’t know if he has the frame for it. He’s tremendous at adjusting to the ball when it’s in the air. He played bigger than his size in college, but his lack of strength will be tested by NFL corners on contested catches and at the line of scrimmage. Durability is my main concern, but Smith has all the tools and has shown the ability to be a future Pro Bowl receiver.  

13. Rashawn Slater, OT, Northwestern (Jr, 6′ 4″, 331 pounds)
Slater could play anywhere on an NFL offensive line, especially in a zone scheme. He’s a fluid athlete and played both RT and LT at Northwestern. He has a great understanding of the game and his footwork and technique are NFL ready as a rookie. I think he’ll be a long-term starting LT in the NFL with Pro Bowl potential.  

14. Kwity Paye, Edge, Michigan (Sr, 6′ 2″, 261 pounds)
Paye is built like a stand-up 3-4 linebacker, but at Michigan was asked almost exclusively to get into the backfield which he was elite at doing. He’s a physical freak and extremely quick to get around the edge or fill his rush lane on stunts and twists. Paye needs to develop a repertoire of pass-rush moves at the next level, but he’s got all the traits to develop into a Pro Bowl caliber edge rusher. Paye works too hard and has developed enough in college to prove he’ll find a way to succeed at the next level.  

15. Christian Baramore, DL, Alabama (R-Soph, 6′ 4″, 310 pounds)
Baramore was extremely productive in his final collegiate season earning All-American Honors and dominating in the national title game on his way to Defensive MVP Honors. He’s big, strong, and agile. He plays with great leverage and is more than capable of collapsing a pocket from the interior. Baramore is a bit chunky and will need to get into better shape to maximize his collegiate potential, but he’s got Pro Bowl upside.      

16. Jeremiah Owusu-Koramoah, LB, Notre Dame (R-Jr, 6′ 1″, 221 pounds)
Owusu-Koramoah looks the part and had the production to match during the past two seasons. Owusu has the ability to play linebacker but could also move to safety or nickel. He has a lot of similarities to Isaiah Simmons from last year’s draft with his versatility. He’s still a bit raw with his approach at times and has some mental lapses, but with maturity and experience he has Pro Bowl upside.           

17. Jaylen Waddle, WR, Alabama (Jr, 5′ 9″, 180 pounds)
Waddle suffered a season-ending ankle injury in October of this season, but his previous two years of work were more than enough proof of the caliber of player Waddle can be in the NFL. Waddle is small and didn’t run at his pro day, but his tape shows that he’s capable of being a #1 receiver in the NFL. Waddle has the potential to be an All-Pro return man, but given his slight frame that’s only going to be an option if he can’t cut it at receiver. He lined up everywhere for Alabama and is a perfect fit in modern NFL offenses with his ability to make defenders miss in the open field. 

18. Teven Jenkins, OT, Oklahoma State (R-Sr, 6′ 5″, 317 pounds)
Jenkins plays with an edge, but needs to improve his foot speed to cover all the ground he’ll be asked to as an NFL tackle. His technique is good when he’s right, but he gets sloppy later in games. He has an extremely strong upper body and could rag doll undersized pass rushers at the collegiate level, but won’t have that same luxury against NFL rushers. His upside is massive given his physical traits and playing style. 

19. Jaycee Horn, CB, South Carolina (Jr, 6′ 0″, 205 pounds)
Horn is physical and long. He’s a tremendous athlete who should only get better with more experience and work on his technique. He’s not as polished as Surtain, but has the higher upside because of his physical tools. He runs well in coverage and won’t get beat over the top because of any speed mismatches. He occasionally was responsible for coverage breakdowns and growing pains should be expected as he adjusts to an NFL scheme.

20. Trevon Moehrig, S, TCU (Jr, 6′ 0″, 202 pounds)
Moehrig has great instincts and plays fast. He’s willing to deliver big hits and seeks contact. He’s a violent thumper, but also can make plays in coverage. He’s got good size and moves well in coverage. Moehrig has a Pro Bowl ceiling and will thrive on special teams as well. He’s a really solid football player that’s ready for the next level.          

21. Mac Jones, QB, Alabama (R-Jr, 6′ 2″, 217 pounds)
Jones is good, but doesn’t have the same ceiling as the quarterbacks ahead of him. He’s not a great athlete and doesn’t have the same arm that would wow you, but his touch is matched only by Trevor Lawrence. He has the chance to be a solid starter, but he’s not a future all-pro. He had arguably the best receiving core in college football history and never had to fit throws into tight windows. He has a great understanding of the game and actually showed a strong ability to progress through his reads behind an NFL caliber o-line at Bama. From a football IQ standpoint, he might be the most NFL ready, but he lacks the athleticism that can open up a modern NFL offense. He’s not boom or bust prospect, he’ll be a solid NFL starter, but never a top-5 in the league caliber guy. 

22. Alijah Vera-Tucker, OG, USC (R-Jr, 6′ 4″, 308 pounds)
Vera-Tucker has the potential to play as a swing tackle, but has a higher upside at guard. He’s not the smoothest mover, but he plays with great balance and power from his base. He’s a hand puncher, but can get pushed back by bigger opposition. He works through his protection assignments quickly and didn’t have any glaring assignment misses in his tape for his final season. He’s a safe pick with Pro Bowl upside at guard.  

23. Gregory Rousseau, Edge, Miami (FL) (R-Soph, 6′ 6″, 266 pounds)
Rousseau is a mountain coming from the edge at 6’6’’ with plenty of room on his frame to add weight without reducing his athleticism. Physically he’s got the highest upside, but he’s extremely raw with just 15 college games and only 7 starts at Miami after opting out of the 2020 season. Rousseau has the highest ceiling in this draft class which is why I’m grading him so high. He has the traits of a future All-Pro, but will need to develop a consistent set of pass rush moves to capitalize on his physical gifts.   

24. Christian Darrisaw, OT, Virginia Tech (Jr, 6′ 4″, 322 pounds)
Darrisaw is a physical blocker with solid footwork and technique. He tends to play a little too up-right in pass protection and he might be better suited for a move into guard long term. He doesn’t finish his blocks like the prospects ranked ahead of him and needs to develop that mean streak to reach his full potential in the NFL because the physical tools are there.

25. Rashod Bateman, WR, Minnesota (Jr, 6′ 0″, 190 pounds)
Bateman is a polished receiver. He runs great routes and does so with little wasted movement. He’s got ideal NFL size with room on his frame to add more weight. He runs well in a straight-line, but doesn’t have a quick burst to make guys miss in a phone booth. He’ll be a match-up problem in the slot at the NFL level, but also can be a deep ball threat lined up outside. He runs every route well, and should be NFL ready week 1.

26. Zaven Collins, LB, Tulsa (R-Jr, 6′ 4″, 259 pounds)
Collins shows great instincts with his ability to read and react to plays. He’s capable in coverage and has a nose for the football. He’s a fluid athlete and breaks down to make tackles effortlessly. Collins doesn’t wow you with his speed or athleticism limiting his ceiling, but he’s a refined football player that is NFL ready.  

27. Landon Dickerson, OG, Alabama (R-Sr, 6′ 5″, 333 pounds)
Dickerson suffered season ending injuries (ACL, and both ankles) in each of his first three collegiate seasons at Florida State before transferring to Alabama for his final two seasons. Dickerson has at least one start at all 5 positions on the offensive line, but he’s best suited for guard or center at the NFL level. He has All-Pro potential and his medical evaluations are the biggest question mark for me. He’s got a high football IQ and plays with great technique. He’s ready to start as a rookie and if he’s healthy he’s the best interior offensive line prospect in this draft.

28. Travis Etienne, RB, Clemson (Sr, 5′ 10″, 215 pounds)
Etienne is very similar to Najee Harris. He’s a receiving threat out of the backfield and has the ability to line up in the slot as well as out of the backfield. He also could be a tremendous weapon as a kick returner. His slight frame might limit the length of his NFL career, but he should easily reach his second contract as a starting running back. He’s a tough runner who can break through contact. He has ok vision, but has that home run burst NFL teams covet.

29. Najee Harris, RB, Alabama (Sr, 6′ 1″, 232 pounds)
Najee Harris is a sure-thing because of his pass-protection. His running and pass-catching prowess is well documented. He’s also a patient runner with tremendous vision built to thrive in the NFL. He’s a future every down back with a one-cut tendency NFL teams covet. He falls forward, but lacks the top end speed to turn a 10-yard carry into a 40-yard run.

30. Alex Leatherwood, OG, Alabama (Sr, 6′ 4″, 312 pounds)
Leatherwood started his career at RG before moving to LT for his final two collegiate seasons. He has the maturity and body to be a day 1 NFL starter. He’s better suited for guard at the next level. He’s consistent and mechanical in his blocking and won’t lose any one-on-ones by getting sloppy. He could potentially stay at tackle as well given his experience and footspeed, but he’ll find a way to start early and stay there.     

31. Rondale Moore, WR, Purdue (R-Soph, 5′ 7″, 181 pounds)
Moore has electrifying tape. His size will force him exclusively into a slot-receiver role at the next level, but his 4.31 40-time will keep him in the NFL for a long time. Teams have to find a way to get the ball in his hands often as he’s a homerun threat whenever he has possession. He’s quick and fast with an absurd 42 1/2” vertical jump at his Pro Day. He might be the best raw athlete in this draft and I think he has All-Pro upside.

32. Azeez Ojulari, Edge, Georgia (R-Soph, 6′ 2″, 249 pounds)
Ojulari checks all the boxes off the field and is reported to be a humble, hardworking guy.  He has the ability to stand up and drop into coverage as a plus athlete, but also understands the best pass rushing route to thee quarterback. At times got overwhelmed by bigger tackles and will need to develop counter moves to win consistently on pass rushes at the next level. He’s a high-ceiling prospect, but not a sure thing like the top pass rush prospects in recent drafts.  

33. Nick Bolton, LB, Missouri (Jr, 5′ 11″, 237 pounds)
Bolton is a big hitter that plays a bit stiff at times. He finishes tackles and imposes his will on ball carriers. He doesn’t have great coverage skills, but moves well enough to keep up with tight ends. He has great instincts and plays hard. He’s a more traditional three-down linebacker that should also contribute on special teams.       

34. Elijah Moore, WR, Ole Miss (Jr, 5′ 9″, 178 pounds)
Moore is a shifty receiver that lacks the size to win at the line of scrimmage so team’s will have to scheme him free releases either out of the backfield or in motion at the snap. He can certainly be a home run threat with 4.35 40-speed. His athletic upside makes up for the work he needs to develop into an NFL level wide receiver. Find a way to get the ball in his hands as a rookie and worry about the route running and receiving skills later.

35. Pat Freiermuth, TE, Penn State (Jr, 6′ 5″, 251 pounds)
Freiermuth is your more traditional tight-end in that his speed matches his frame much. He’s an ok blocker at initial contact, but he struggles to stay engaged in blocks or seal off defenders on run plays to his side. He’s athletic and big enough to improve as a blocker and develop into a Pro Bowl caliber player, but should make an instant impact as a hand in the dirt receiver.

36. Kyle Trask, QB, Florida (R-Sr, 6′ 5″, 236 pounds)
Trask certainly benefited from a QB friendly system run by Dan Mullen and also having the second best prospect in this draft to throw to in Kyle Pitts. He has mediocre arm talent, but showed the ability to trust his receivers and throw into tight coverage. I think he’s got better upside than most and could be the next Ben Roethlisberger. Don’t be shocked to see him sneak into the late first round and emerge as a quality NFL starter. He’s got the poise in the pocket and enough physical tools to make it.

37. Samuel Cosmi, OT, Texas (R-Jr, 6′ 5″, 314 pounds)
Cosmi is a talented run blocker, with solid footwork and technique to make up for his lack of size and strength. He’s probably better suited to move inside, but if he can add size, he’ll be a long-time OT in the NFL.  He improved each year at Texas and is more polished than more OL prospects entering this year’s draft.

38. Joe Tryon, Edge, Washington (R-Jr, 6′ 5″, 259 pounds)
Tyron is a smart, instinctive football player. He makes the play that’s there for him and doesn’t over pursue on his pass rushes to take himself out of the action. He knows when to drop into the flats and reads the play before it happens. He has a knack for getting to the quarterback with several pass rush moves already in his toolbox. I think he’s more NFL-ready than some of the higher-upside prospects in this position group.

39. Asante Samuel Jr, CB, Florida State (Jr, 5′ 10″, 180 pounds)
Samuel has NFL bloodlines with his father playing 11 seasons at DB in the NFL. Samuel lacks ideal size, but runs well and is a fluid athlete. At times, Samuel gets caught peaking into the backfield, but his technique in coverage is sound. Samuel shows the ability to shed blocks, but his size won’t make that easy against NFL receivers. Samuel can play both inside and outside and plays fundamentally sound enough to start in the NFL for a long time despite lacking the size you want from an outside corner.  

40. Caleb Farley, CB, Virginia Tech (R-Jr, 6′ 1″, 197 pounds)
Farley’s biggest negative is his struggles to win 50-50 balls. He’s not great once the ball is in the air, despite having the height and athleticism to make plays on the ball. He’s twitchy and runs hard in coverage, but doesn’t look fluid with his hips. He has the physical traits of a Pro Bowl cornerback, but has injury concerns leading to a microdiscectomy from a back injury leading to him being unable to workout in the lead up to the draft. He’s well-schooled coming from Bud Foster’s defense and if he can stay healthy has shutdown corner potential.                      

41. Jamin Davis, LB, Kentucky (R-Jr, 6′ 3″, 234 pounds)
Davis is strong in coverage with solid ball skills for a linebacker. He runs well and plays fast without seeming sped up. Davis isn’t a thumper, but makes physical plays when needed. He’s a good not great run defender, but has the physical tools needed to defend modern NFL schemes.       

42. Richie Grant, S, UCF (R-Sr, 5′ 11″, 197 pounds)
Grant is the top safety in a weak class. He’s a ball hawk that was extremely productive at UCF. He’s a good, but not great athlete who will turn 24 during his rookie season. Grant would also benefit from filling out more in order to stay on the field throughout his career. He doesn’t have a Pro Bowl ceiling, but should develop into a solid NFL starter.          

43. Creed Humphrey, OC, Oklahoma (R-Jr, 6′ 4″, 302 pounds)
Humphrey is strong and technically sound as a blocker. He has 37 starts at center under his belt and was the back-to-back Big 12 Offensive Lineman of the year. Humphrey reacts quickly to the play in front of him and shows all the traits of a future franchise center. He has the ability to play guard as well and his polished technique will earn him a starting role as a rookie.

44. Kadarius Toney, WR, Florida (Sr, 5′ 11″, 193 pounds)
Kadarius Toney has off-field red flags stemming from an incident relating to an air-soft gun he owned that resembled an AR-15 assault rifle. He also has some injury history with two separate shoulder injuries and some shin issues as well. On the field, Toney was used as a weapon more than a receiver. His route running and ball skills need work, but he’s dangerous with the ball in the open field. He’ll make an immediate impact as a kick returner, with thee potential to develop into a quality NFL receiver. It might just be the college uniform, but he’s got a little Percy Harvin to his game.

45. Joseph Ossai, Edge, Texas (Jr, 6′ 3″, 256 pounds)
Ossai works as hard as anyone on his film. He chases down the ball carrier anywhere on the field. He fills his rush lanes with aggression and has big and strong hands to move blockers out of his way. His effort will help him stay in the NFL, but he needs to better understand his role and the plays happening around him to better convert his effort into significant production at the next level.    

46. Milton Williams, DL, Louisiana Tech (R-Jr, 6′ 3″, 284 pounds)
Williams overwhelmed his competition at Louisiana Tech using his raw power and speed to produce tackles in the backfield. He plays a bit too tall at points, but runs hard and finishes plays with his speed when he’s stood up at the line of scrimmage. He’s a raw prospect, but his physical traits are appealing and he’s such an impressive athlete that will benefit from NFL coaching as well as strength and conditioning.      

47. Elijah Molden, CB, Washington (Sr, 5′ 9″, 192 pounds)
Molden is undersized, but doesn’t play like it. He’s a big hitter and seeks out contact. He’s got good ball skills, but doesn’t run particularly well. Molden doesn’t have the physical tools or athleticism NFL teams covet, but he makes plays and will find a way to stick around in the NFL due to his ability to force takeaways and his physicality.         

48. Daviyon Nixon, DL, Iowa (R-Jr, 6′ 1″, 313 pounds)
Nixon is a great athlete and shined in his final season at Iowa. He plays aggressively and flashes violence to get off blocks. He makes plays out in space and has the ability to penetrate and collapse the pocket. Nixon’s tape doesn’t lie and his production in college can’t be questioned. He was impressive in his Pro Day and has a high ceiling with his physical tools.      

49. Jayson Oweh, Edge, Penn State (R-Soph, 6′ 4″, 257 pounds)
Oweh is big and strong in a way that jumps out on tape. He’s extremely fast clocking a 4.37 40-yd dash at his pro day. Oweh is extremely raw, with just 8 college starts and only 24 games played in three college seasons. He’s a project, but has the physical tools to be a star in this league. He’s a high-ceiling player with boom-or-bust potential simply due to how raw he is. You’re drafting an athlete, not a football player with Oweh.

50. Jalen Mayfield, OG, Michigan (Jr, 6′ 5″, 326 pounds)
Mayfield is relatively raw with only 18 games played, all at RT in college. Mayfield has shorter arms that make him better suited to move inside. Mayfield is strong with his hands as a run blocker and smooth in his pass sets. He moves fluidly, but doesn’t have the quickest feet. He won’t be athletically dominant against NFL competition, but has the physical tools to be a long-time starter.

51. Brady Christensen, OT, BYU (R-Jr, 6′ 5″, 302 pounds)
Christensen will be 25 before his first NFL bye-week which might scare some NFL teams off of him. He’s a quick athlete for his size and has great bend with fluid hips. He loves to run block and is capable of pulling. He’s comfortable blocking in an RPO scheme which is becoming more common in the NFL. He needs to improve his timing, but he’s an NFL sized player who’s shown enough to project as a starting NFL OT.

52. Josh Myers, OC, Ohio State (R-Jr, 6′ 5″, 310 pounds)
Myers started 21 games at center in three seasons at Ohio State. He could’ve improved his draft stock with another season of work, but he’s a tough football player that knows his role and executes it. He’s a high-IQ player, but lacks the athleticism to be a future Pro Bowler. He’s already close to his ceiling and should have a strong chance to start as a rookie.   

53. Payton Turner, Edge, Houston (Sr, 6′ 5″, 270 pounds)
I like Turner’s tape a lot. He plays a little too tall and upright, but was productive because of his motor. He was able to overpower a lot of guys in college and will need to develop more pass rush moves to succeed in the NFL. You can’t coach the size he brings to the table and I’m inclined to bet on guys that play as hard as he does.     

54. Liam Eichenberg, OT, Notre Dame (R-Sr, 6′ 6″, 306 pounds)
Eichenberg explodes into his drops on pass protections and moves fluidly. He lacks the upper body strength to physically dominate edge rushers, but his technique keeps clean pockets. He’s not as long or big as you’d like from an NFL OT and will be better suited for a move inside to guard at the NFL level.    

55. Trey Smith, OG, Tennessee (Sr, 6′ 5″, 321 pounds)
Smith battled blood clots in his lungs during his sophomore season so his medical evaluations might remove him from some team’s boards, which is a shame because I think he’s a potential steal. He started at LG each of the past two seasons after beginning his career at LT. Smith’s issues are all mental. He’s not consistently dialed in, missing assignments throughout his film. He also can play overly aggressive at times, taking him out of position. When he’s playing the right way, he’s a Pro Bowl caliber player, but when his head isn’t in the game, it shows. He needs an offensive line room and coaching staff that can hold him accountable because he’s talented enough to be a star.     

56. Levi Onwuzurkie, DL, Washington (R-Sr, 6′ 2″, 290 pounds)
Onwuzurike underwhelmed on film. He came off as too heavy and played with poor leverage often ending up on the ground prior to making a play. He battled injuries throughout his career, including one that kept him out of most Senior Bowl activities. Onwuzurike has the build to be successful, but will need to clean up his technique and better understand his gap assignments to become a consistent starter.      

57. Eric Stokes, CB, Georgia (R-Jr, 6′ 0″, 194 pounds)
Stokes is the fastest prospect in this class clocking a 4.29 40 at his Pro Day. He plays with that speed on tape and has the physical tools and athleticism of an elite NFL cornerback. However, Stokes technique in coverage isn’t good enough and he can get lost in coverage at times. He’s late to recognize plays and will need a lot of coaching to become a consistent NFL starter, but he’s a project worth investing in due to the abundance of elite tools he brings to the table.          

58. Ifeatu Melifonwu, CB, Syracuse (R-Jr, 6′ 2″, 205 pounds)
Melifonwu is a big bodied corner that covers a lot of ground with his long stride. Melifonwu struggles with sudden change of direction and reacts to plays more often than anticipating what’s coming. I love his upside due to his size and athleticism, but will struggle to cover quicker receivers who can exploit his footwork with sudden changes in direction.         

59. Marlon Tuipulotu, DL, USC (R-Jr, 6′ 1″, 307 pounds)
Tuipulotu’s lacks the explosiveness and agility to become a dominant interior pass rusher, but he consistently makes the plays that are there for him. He doesn’t have the highest ceiling given his frame, but he’ll make an NFL roster because of his ability to maximize opportunities to make the play in front of him. He won’t miss tackles and when he is left unblocked he bursts to make the play every time.

60. Spencer Brown, OT, Northern Iowa (R-Sr, 6′ 8″, 311 pounds)
Spencer Brown is a brawler with a massive frame that will benefit from an NFL strength program. He’s got the size to be a Pro Bowl caliber OT. His footwork is great for his size and he gets good leverage despite his height. He played exclusively RT at Northern Iowa and at 6’8” his heigh might scare some teams with shorter quarterbacks away. He’s a project, but if you trust your coaching staff he’s very much worth taking.

61. Kenneth Gainwell, RB, Memphis (R-Soph, 5′ 8″, 201 pounds)
Gainwell spent a lot of time split out at receiver in addition to lining up in the back field. He’s a true weapon for modern NFL offenses with his speed and shiftiness in the open field. He’s fluid with his hands as a pass catcher, but also shows good vision as a ball carrier. Memphis ran a wide open offense that found Gainwell in space a lot, but he has shown the ability to make an offensive impact in two different positions that make him an asset to an NFL team.

62. Terrace Marshall Jr, WR, LSU (Sr, 6′ 2″, 205 pounds)
Marshall had a knack for quitting on plays that he wasn’t involved in that jumped out on film. He’s got prototypical size for an NFL receiver. He was productive on the 2019 LSU title team with 13 TDs and also scored 10 TDs in just 7 games this season before opting out. It’s worth noting he opted out prior to a potential showcase game with Alabama this season. He can drop uncontested catches due to a lack of concentration at times. His interviews with teams needed to be great or I could see him falling into day three. He ran a 4.4 40 at his pro day which should see him taken by the early second round given his size, but he’ll need to learn how to separate from NFL defensive backs.

63. Baron Browning, LB, Ohio State (Sr, 6′ 2″, 245 pounds)
Browning is an explosive athlete that runs hard and initiates contact. He was used in a variety of roles within Ohio State’s scheme and has great versatility. Browning plays fast, but at times looks sped up and out of position. His football instincts aren’t where they need to be and he needs to better understand his responsibilities within a defense to become an NFL starter.  

64.  Paulson Adebo, CB, Stanford (R-Jr, 6′ 1″, 198 pounds)
Adebo has NFL size and is a plus athlete. He understands the game well and plays with great instincts. He isn’t particularly fluid in his movement and can’t get beat by double moves and quality route runners. He’s a strong tackler, but feels closer to a finished product than other prospects. He can get turned around in coverage, but his technique with the ball in the air is solid. He’s not a shutdown corner, but he has the potential to be a starter in the NFL.                

65. Nico Collins, WR, Michigan (Sr, 6′ 4″, 215 pounds)
Nico Collins is a tough player to evaluate. He opted our of his senior season after falling victim to subpar quarterback play throughout his career at Michigan. Collins is a big bodied, old-school outside receiver. He’s strong and more than capable of making contested catches. He’ll be a weapon in the red zone, but runs well enough to be a deep route threat on the outside. His collefe production feels incomplete given what his tape shows. He’s faster than he is quick, but should fit into an NFL receiving core as a dependable possession receiver with solid #2 upside.

66. Wyatt Davis, OG, Ohio State (R-Jr, 6′ 3″, 315 pounds)
Davis is a true guard prospect who started at RG throughout his time in Columbus. Davis needs to improve his consistency, but when he’s on he’s a monster. He’s more than capable of being a long-term NFL starter due to his strength. He needs some refinement in his technique and sometimes sought blocks that took him out of position. He can develop into an long-term starter, but he’s not a sure thing right now.     

67. Trey Sermon, RB, Ohio State (Sr, 6′ 0″, 215 pounds)
Sermon is a pure runner, who doesn’t hesitate to hit the hole and burst through it with bad intentions. He’s more than capable of lowering his shoulder to pick up a big gain, but also has the athleticism to make guys miss in the open field. He’s more than capable of being a difference maker in the NFL who might slip out of the second round because his measurables don’t wow you.

68. Dyami Brown, WR, North Carolina (Jr, 6′ 0″, 189 pounds)
Brown is a fluid athlete, but had 15 drops over his last two years. He loses focus at times and lacked the consistency of a first-round prospect despite his production over the last two season.  He runs well and can take the top off a defense. He’s got solid upside as his football IQ expands and he matures as a player. He has all the physical tools to be a long-time starting NFL receiver if he gets comfortable playing through contact and keeps his head in games.

69. D’Ante Smith, OT, East Carolina (R-Sr, 6′ 5″, 305 pounds)
D’Ante Smith plays with good bend and flexibility. His technique is raw, but his athleticism gives him a lot of upside. He plays with enough balance to hold up against power rushes, but als has the quickness to stay in front of speed rushers. Smith played well against top competition at the Senior Bowl showing that his raw talent and experience will allow him to earn a roster spot and potential start on an NFL offensive line as a rookie at guard.

70. Jevon Holland, S, Oregon (Jr, 6′ 0″, 207 pounds)
Holland runs well in coverage and seeks out the football. He reads the ball in the air and knows how to make plays when given the opportunity. Holland has upside as a kick and punt returner as well. He’s a competitor and will fit well as a nickel safety who can be deployed in a variety of ways depending on opposing personnel.    

71. Amon-Ra St. Brown, WR, USC (Jr, 5′ 11″, 197 pounds)
His last name should be familiar to NFL fans after his brother Equanimeous was drafted by the Packers in 2018. He also has another older brother who played receiver at Stanford. Amon-Ra isn’t the biggest prospect and didn’t run particularly well at his Pro Day. St. Brown is a polished prospect and will be able to contribute in the NFL, but his speed and athleticism cap his potential at a quality #2 receiver at best.     

72. Dillon Radunz, OT, NDSU R-Sr, 6′ 5″, 301 pounds)
Radunz has a tendency to light guys up which is good when it works, but leaves him off balance too often at the point of attack. He can get reckless in pursuit of his blocking assignments. This will lead to some high lights, but also allow savvy defensive lineman to gain inside leverage when Radunz gets over confident. Radunz needs some refinement and perhaps humility from facing NFL talent in order to improve his football IQ enough to start in the NFL. He’s got the right mentality, but needs to be reined in to not get exposed at the next level. He’s also built for a move inside.

73. Carlos Basham Jr., Edge, Wake Forest (R-Sr, 6′ 3″, 274 pounds)
Basham is an experienced, more filled out edge prospect. He’s thick with less need to project him physically to the next level. He was very productive for three seasons at Wake Forest. His size and quickness gives him some versatility as he can be moved to rush from the inside as necessary. He’ll contribute in the NFL, but lacks the athleticism to be anything more than an above-average starter.    

74. Quinn Meinerz, OC, Wisconsin-Whitewater (Sr, 6′ 2″, 320 pounds)
Meinerz plays bigger than his listed height and he’s well filled in with more room to grow in an NFL strength program. He overmatched Division III competition with his size and athleticism. Against stiff competition at the Senior Bowl he held his own. He has great technique and is physically built to succeed in the NFL, he just needs more time to adapt to NFL competition than his Division I counterparts. He started all his college games at LG, but will be better suited at center given his height and frame.   

75. Amari Rodgers, WR, Clemson (Sr, 5′ 9″, 212 pounds)
Rodgers had a breakout senior season as the primary target for Trevor Lawrence. He’s short, but carries enough weight in his frame to stay on the field at the next level. His route running is crisp and he’s got strong hands to make tough catches. His size will keep him in the slot, but he’s a tough, competitive player that will find a way to contribute both on offense and in special teams.

76. Aaron Banks, OG, Notre Dame (R-Jr, 6′ 5″, 325 pounds)
Banks lost his fair share of hand fights when dropping into pass protection, but you can tell he loves to block. He shines as a run blocker who gets downfield quickly and looks for work. He needs to improve his balance to take advantage of his massive size in the NFL because too often he was lying on the ground after making initial contact on run plays. He’s not the most fluid athlete, but his strength and frame should allow him to blossom into a starting NFL guard.   

77. Jay Tufele, DL, USC (R-Jr, 6′ 2″, 305 pounds)
Tufele is stout and plays with great effort. He projects as a three-technique in the NFL. Who needs to improve his ability to get off blocks. Tufele is already a plus against the run, but needs to improve as a pass rusher to shine in the NFL. He sat out this past season and needs refinement to contribute at the next level.      

78. Jabril Cox, LB, LSU (R-Sr, 6′ 3″, 232 pounds)
Cox is too often around plays, but not actually the one making them. He can drop into coverage, but needs to improve his run defense. The NDSU grad transfer has the potential to be an every down linebacker because he’s a great athlete, but he needs to improve his football IQ to maximize his physical tools and stay on the field in the NFL.        

79. Tyson Campbell, CB, Georgia (Jr, 6′ 1″, 193 pounds)
Campbell is another project. He’s got great physical tools and runs extremely well, but was unproductive in college with just one career interception in 33 games played including 24 starts.   Campbell is another boom or bust guy. He’s extremely raw, but should be able to contribute on special teams immediately at the very least.        

80. Tylan Wallace, WR, Oklahoma State (Sr, 5′ 11″, 194 pounds)
Wallace runs like a bowling ball after the catch. He’s big and physical despite his smaller frame. He’s a mechanic in his route running and finds ways to get open despite lacking plus size or speed. He can high-point the ball and make contested catches. He’s a tough player, but battled injuries including a torn ACL in 2019. His medical evaluation will be key, but he has all the qualities you want in a starting NFL receiver.

81. Walker Little, OT, Stanford (R-Jr, 6′ 7″, 313 pounds)
Little arrived at the offensive lineman factory that is Stanford as a 5-start OT prospect. Injusries prevented him from building off a strong sophomore season and he opted out of this season meaning his last football game was in August of 2019. His durability and timing issues are concerns and his tape is old. His medical evaluation will be critical, but his pedigree will keep NFL teams interested. With his height, he can become an NFL OT through a quality strength program with plenty of frame to add weight to. He’s a high-upside boom or bust prospect who will benefit from preseason games but won’t be ready to start as a rookie.

82. Kelvin Joseph, CB, Kentucky (R-Soph, 5′ 11″, 197 pounds)
Joseph lacks football instincts you’d like from a cornerback. He’s needs to improve as a tackler and show more of a willingness to involve himself in plays where he’s not targeted. Joseph only started 9 games in college and played in just 20 so he is an extremely raw prospect. He’s got the physical tools to cover any receiver, but he’s a boom-or-bust prospect that could struggle to adjust to NFL competition where he won’t just be able to get by on athleticism.          

83. Ronnie Perkins, Edge, Oklahoma (Jr, 6′ 2″, 253 pounds)
Perkins is an athlete with an edge rusher’s body. He’s only slightly too big to line up as a stand up linebacker on every down, but he moves so fluidly. He ran slow at his Pro Day, but his game tape shows adequate speed. He has strong hands and a quick burst off the edge. He was very productive in his three years at Oklahoma. A failed drug test is one major red flag. He should be able to contribute right away on special teams.   

84. Hamsah Nasirildeen, S, Florida State (Sr, 6′ 3″, 215 pounds)
Nasirildeen is a big safety, but plays with more finesse than physicality. Nasirildeen never was able to build off a strong junior year after tearing his ACL in the season finale. He didn’t run during his Pro Day due to a hamstring strain. He’s got a lot of traits you’d like out of a box safety but needs a defined role within a defense to better understand the game and how he can contribute.  

85. Tutu Atwell, WR, Louisville (Jr, 5′ 8″, 155 pounds)
Atwell is small, even beyond NFL standards. You simply don’t see guys in the NFL weighing under 160 pounds. He’s the fastest receiver in this class running a 4.35 40 at his Pro Day. He’ll take the top off a defense, but his size will keep him away from the middle of the field, because he’s simply not built to withstand NFL hits. His speed will allow him to contribute as long as he can stay on the field. His ability to out run everyone will determine how long he can stay on the field. His drops and foot injuries are concerns, but his speed is too fast to pass up on day two.

86. David Moore, OG, Grambling State (R-Sr, 6′ 1″, 330 pounds)
Moore is a thick-bodied, strong-handed force on the inside. He can play guard and center and moves well enough to pull as a run blocker, although it’s not a strength. He will need to get into better shape to stay on the field at the next level. His footwork and hand placement also need work, but I just love the way he plays. He’s a nasty blocker without being careless or picking up dumb penalties. He’s certainly worth taking as a long-term project.     

87. James Hudson, OT, Cincinnati (R-Jr, 6′ 4″, 313 pounds)
After redshirting and transferring from Michigan, Hudson only played in 14 collegiate games, with 11 career starts all at LT for Cincinnati. Hudson helped up well at the Senior Bowl, but his lack of experience is evident in his technique. He’s got the physical traits to develop into a starting NFL left tackle, but he needs a lot of coaching and would benefit from a redshirt year during his rookie season.    

88. Dayo Odeyingbo, Edge, Vanderbilt (Sr, 6′ 5″, 285 pounds)
Odeyingbo tore his Achilles during draft prep in January which could see him fall to day three. He might be better suited for a move inside in the NFL given his frame. He plays through the whistle and jump out for how competitive he played on a bad Vandy team. Assuming he can physically get back to the player he was in college, Odeyingbo is going to find a way to stick around in this league.    

89. Aaron Robinson, CB, UCF (R-Sr, 5′ 11″, 186 pounds)
Robinson needs to improve his discipline to match his physicality to more quality play. Robinson is slow to react and doesn’t see the game well. He’s tough and will line up inside and outside, although he’s likely best suited for nickel in the NFL.     

90. Bobby Brown III, DL, Texas A&M (Jr, 6′ 4″, 321 pounds)
Brown is massive and plays like it. He wins at the line of scrimmage and has a knack for collapsing the pocket. He penetrates easily, sometimes taking himself out of plays against the run. Brown isn’t yet 21 and needs refinement to develop into a starter, but he has great physical tools, but needs to improve his conditioning so that he stays on the field and avoids some focus related errors.      

91. D’Wayne Eskridge, WR, Western Michigan (R-Sr, 5′ 8″, 190 pounds)
Eskridge is a burner. He ran a 4.39 40 and presents immediate calure as a kick-returner in the NFL. He’s under-sized but a solid pass catcher who will contribute in special teams and can contribute in 3 and 4-wide sets at the next level. He reminds me of John Brown with his athleticism, but his size will keep him from becoming a #2 WR.

92. Javonte Williams, RB, North Carolina (Jr, 5′ 9″, 212 pounds)
Javonte Williams is a two-down back. He can’t pass protect, but his initial burst makes him the ideal running back to hit a hole and go. He’s a capable pass-catching threat but didn’t do much as a receiver in college. His 40 time was unimpressive in terms of separating from defenders, but he has enough physical tools to make it in the NFL.

93. Kellen Mond, QB, Texas A&M (Sr, 6′ 2″, 211 pounds)
Kellen Mond has a lot of Dak Prescott to him when he’s at his best. He’s got tremendous running ability, but his throwing mechanics are very unrefined. Under Jimbo Fischer he was a one-read and done guy too often locking in on his primary target and forcing throws into double coverage. He’s not particularly accurate, but with some polishing should be a solid NFL back-up. He can’t make enough NFL caliber throws yet to be a starter.

94. Cade Johnson, WR, South Dakota State (R-Sr, 5′ 10″, 184 pounds)
Cade Johnson was another FCS victim with his senior season postponed until the Spring forcing him to miss his final season to enter the NFL Draft. Fortunately, he was able to compete in the Senior Bowl where he put on a show in one-on-ones. He’s a Wes Welker type possession receiver that’s stocky and willing to go across the middle. He’d fit perfectly in the Patriots system with his knack to get open underneath and pick up the tough yards after the catch. He had fumble issues at SDSU which will remain a concern against NFL physicality.

95. Brevin Jordan, TE, Miami (FL) (Jr, 6′ 2″, 247 pounds)
Jordan is built more like a thick receiver than a tradition tight end. He’s not a blocker, but he’ll fit in well as the #2 tight end in 12 personnel sets. He missed at least one game with an injury in all three seasons at Miami so durability has to be a concern. He runs well enough at game speed to separate from certain linebackers, but his lack of height makes him a good defensive match-up for any NFL safety.

96. Deonte Brown, OG, Alabama (R-Sr, 6′ 3” 344 pounds)
“Violated team rules” leading to a six-game suspension at Alabama. Brown is top-heavy and can play too upright at times. He’s not quick or nimble and struggles to recover against defensive lineman with good initial burst. Beyond the character concerns from the suspension, Brown battled weight issues early at Alabama so he may need more attention than other rookies to maximize his potential. He has the ability to stay in the NFL for a long time despite some question marks, but lacks Pro Bowl upside due to his limited athleticism.   

97. Tommy Tremble, TE, Notre Dame (R-Soph, 6′ 3″, 241 pounds)
Tremble is a fullback/TE prospect. He’s the best blocker in this class, but wasn’t ever a primary receiving threat at Notre Dame. He improved as a red zone threat in his final season, but his physical playing style and athleticism will keep him in the NFL for a long time as a special-teamer. He could become a Pro Bowl fullback in the right system, but he’s not a true tight end for team’s that use their ends for in-line blocking.

98. Jackson Carman, OG, Clemson (Jr, 6′ 4″, 317 pounds)
Carman is a raw prospect despite amassing 27 starts at LT for Clemson. He’s a physical specimen that will benefit from moving to guard, but he needs a lot of work on his technique in pass protection. He got away with bad footwork and hand placement due to his size advantage in college, but will get exposed by NFL pass rushers without proper coaching. He’s a project who won’t start right away, but is physically prepared for the NFL.    

99. Rashad Weaver, Edge, Pittsburgh (R-Sr, 6′ 4″, 259 pounds)
Weaver missed the 2019 season with a torn ACL, but returned in 2020 with his best collegiate season. Weaver is a great athlete for his size and uses his instincts to make plays when he can’t get to the quarterback. He’s a smart football player with some athleticism limitations in terms of speed and quickness, but his production shows he can overcome those shortcomings. He should earn a second contract, but may never jump out in NFL games.    

100. Quincy Roche, Edge, Miami (FL) (R-Sr, 6′ 2″, 245 pounds)
Roche feasted as a transfer on a loaded Miami front four. His production throughout his college career, which started at Temple, is eye-popping. He’s slightly undersized but the tape doesn’t lie. He knows how to make plays and filled his role well with the Hurricanes. He’ll find a way onto an NFL roster and can stick around this league for a while.     

Quarterbacks –

1. Trevor Lawrence, QB, Clemson (JR, 6′ 5″, 213 pounds)
Lawrence has all the tools to be the best QB in the NFL for the next two decades. His throwing mechanics are polished, he’s tall, he carries himself extremely well off the field, and he’s very athletic. Lawrence is built to fit into a modern NFL offense with his ability to run the football when needed. He’ll need to add more weight to his 6’5” frame, but he’s week 1 ready as a rookie. He’s the closest thing to a sure thing since Peyton Manning entered the draft. 
(Overall #1)

2. Zach Wilson, QB, BYU (JR, 6′ 2″, 214 pounds)
Wilson is a prospect that would’ve been overlooked a decade ago, but he’s entering the NFL at the right time. He’s a plus athlete with great elusiveness, but not built to be a regular runner. In addition, despite his smaller frame he can sling it with force and on the move. He can make all the throws Lawrence can, but does so from various arm angles to make up for his lack of height when he stays in the pocket. He can get happy feet and left the pocket prematurely a lot at BYU behind one of the best lines in the country. He’ll have to adjust to an NFL pass rush and learn to stay more disciplined in the pocket at the next level, but all the tools are there to be a franchise quarterback. 
(Overall #2)

3. Trey Lance, QB, NDSU (R-Soph, 6′ 3″, 224 pounds)
Lance played one college football game this season after the FCS opted to play a spring season. He played one full season for NDSU leading the Bison to an undefeated season and national title as a RS-Freshman. He played in NDSU’s lone fall game of 2020, a win over Central Arkansas. I like Lance a lot, but he’s a major project and can’t start week 1 in 2021. He needs a year or two to sit and learn while refining his mechanics. His downfield accuracy needs work and he drops his arm lower than I’d like for his release. He is far and away the best running threat of this year’s quarterbacks. The reality is Lance is a boom-or-bust prospect depending on where he lands. He has the tools to be the second-best quarterback in this draft behind Lawrence, but if he’s named a day-1 starter on a bad team, things could go sideways with him. He reminds me a lot of Lamar Jackson where he’ll need the right scheme to thrive. 
(Overall #6)

4. Justin Fields, QB, Ohio State (Jr, 6′ 2″, 227 pounds)
Fields is a gamer. His biggest flaw is that he played in such a collegiate system that he’ll have to adjust his approach at the NFL level. Very rarely did he need to fit throws in tight windows. More often than not he was hitting guys open by five yards. His deep ball accuracy is really impressive and his arm talent is a major plus. He’s a solid runner and tough enough to withstand big hits despite his slight frame. He’s got a body that should be able to add 20-30 more pounds during his career. He’s got a lot of similarities to Deshaun Watson. I just haven’t seen him need to make many NFL throws because his weapons were that good at Ohio State. The struggles against Northwestern were real and should be a cause for concern, but he’s got enough tools to become a franchise quarterback. 
(Overall #9)

5. Mac Jones, QB, Alabama (R-Jr, 6′ 2″, 217 pounds)
Jones is good, but doesn’t have the same ceiling as the quarterbacks ahead of him. He’s not a great athlete and doesn’t have the same arm that would wow you, but his touch is matched only by Trevor Lawrence. He has the chance to be a solid starter, but he’s not a future all-pro. He had arguably the best receiving core in college football history and never had to fit throws into tight windows. He has a great understanding of the game and actually showed a strong ability to progress through his reads behind an NFL caliber o-line at Bama. From a football IQ standpoint, he might be the most NFL ready, but he lacks the athleticism that can open up a modern NFL offense. He’s not boom or bust prospect, he’ll be a solid NFL starter, but never a top-5 in the league caliber guy. 
(Overall #21)

6. Kyle Trask, QB, Florida (R-Sr, 6′ 5″, 236 pounds)
Trask certainly benefited from a QB friendly system run by Dan Mullen and also having the second best prospect in this draft to throw to in Kyle Pitts. He has mediocre arm talent, but showed the ability to trust his receivers and throw into tight coverage. I think he’s got better upside than most and could be the next Ben Roethlisberger. Don’t be shocked to see him sneak into the late first round and emerge as a quality NFL starter. He’s got the poise in the pocket and enough physical tools to make it. 
(Overall #36)

7. Kellen Mond, QB, Texas A&M (Sr, 6′ 2″, 211 pounds)
Kellen Mond has a lot of Dak Prescott to him when he’s at his best. He’s got tremendous running ability, but his throwing mechanics are very unrefined. Under Jimbo Fischer he was a one-read and done guy too often locking in on his primary target and forcing throws into double coverage. He’s not particularly accurate, but with some polishing should be a solid NFL back-up. He can’t make enough NFL caliber throws yet to be a starter. 
(Overall #93)

Running Backs – 

1. Travis Etienne, RB, Clemson (Sr, 5′ 10″, 215 pounds)
Etienne is very similar to Najee Harris. He’s a receiving threat out of the backfield and has the ability to line up in the slot as well as out of the backfield. He also could be a tremendous weapon as a kick returner. His slight frame might limit the length of his NFL career, but he should easily reach his second contract as a starting running back. He’s a tough runner who can break through contact. He has ok vision, but has that home run burst NFL teams covet. 
(Overall #28)

2. Najee Harris, RB, Alabama (Sr, 6′ 1″, 232 pounds)
Najee Harris is a sure-thing because of his pass-protection. His running and pass-catching prowess is well documented. He’s also a patient runner with tremendous vision built to thrive in the NFL. He’s a future every down back with a one-cut tendency NFL teams covet. He falls forward, but lacks the top end speed to turn a 10-yard carry into a 40-yard run. 
(Overall #29)

3. Kenneth Gainwell, RB, Memphis (R-Soph, 5′ 8″, 201 pounds)
Gainwell spent a lot of time split out at receiver in addition to lining up in the back field. He’s a true weapon for modern NFL offenses with his speed and shiftiness in the open field. He’s fluid with his hands as a pass catcher, but also shows good vision as a ball carrier. Memphis ran a wide open offense that found Gainwell in space a lot, but he has shown the ability to make an offensive impact in two different positions that make him an asset to an NFL team. 
(Overall #61)

4. Trey Sermon, RB, Ohio State (Sr, 6′ 0″, 215 pounds)
Sermon is a pure runner, who doesn’t hesitate to hit the hole and burst through it with bad intentions. He’s more than capable of lowering his shoulder to pick up a big gain, but also has the athleticism to make guys miss in the open field. He’s more than capable of being a difference maker in the NFL who might slip out of the second round because his measurables don’t wow you. 
(Overall #67)

5. Javonte Williams, RB, North Carolina (Jr, 5′ 9″, 212 pounds)
Javonte Williams is a two-down back. He can’t pass protect, but his initial burst makes him the ideal running back to hit a hole and go. He’s a capable pass-catching threat but didn’t do much as a receiver in college. His 40 time was unimpressive in terms of separating from defenders, but he has enough physical tools to make it in the NFL. 
(Overall #92)

Wide Receivers – 

1. Ja’Marr Chase, WR, LSU (Jr, 6′ 0″, 201 pounds)
Ja’Marr Chase is a physical freak. While he’s not the tallest receiver, he plays bigger than his 6’0” listing and has filled out nicely, with room for more weight. He’s also extremely young just turning 21 in March. He opted out of his finals season so only has two full seasons to his credit as a college player, but he won the Biletnikoff as a true sophomore amongst a loaded LSU receiving core. Chase runs extremely well and has great body control. OBJ feels like a fair comparison given Chase’s talent and upside with his plus athleticism. 
(Overall #5)

2. Devonta Smith, WR, Alabama (Sr, 6′ 0″, 170 pounds)
The only problem with Devonta Smith as an NFL prospect is he’s skinny. He’ll need to add a lot of weight during his NFL career and I don’t know if he has the frame for it. He’s tremendous at adjusting to the ball when it’s in the air. He played bigger than his size in college, but his lack of strength will be tested by NFL corners on contested catches and at the line of scrimmage. Durability is my main concern, but Smith has all the tools and has shown the ability to be a future Pro Bowl receiver.  
(Overall #12)

3. Jaylen Waddle, WR, Alabama (Jr, 5′ 9″, 180 pounds)
Waddle suffered a season-ending ankle injury in October of this season, but his previous two years of work were more than enough proof of the caliber of player Waddle can be in the NFL. Waddle is small and didn’t run at his pro day, but his tape shows that he’s capable of being a #1 receiver in the NFL. Waddle has the potential to be an All-Pro return man, but given his slight frame that’s only going to be an option if he can’t cut it at receiver. He lined up everywhere for Alabama and is a perfect fit in modern NFL offenses with his ability to make defenders miss in the open field. 
(Overall #17)

4. Rashod Bateman, WR, Minnesota (Jr, 6′ 0″, 190 pounds)
Bateman is a polished receiver. He runs great routes and does so with little wasted movement. He’s got ideal NFL size with room on his frame to add more weight. He runs well in a straight-line, but doesn’t have a quick burst to make guys miss in a phone booth. He’ll be a match-up problem in the slot at the NFL level, but also can be a deep ball threat lined up outside. He runs every route well, and should be NFL ready week 1. 
(Overall #25)

5. Rondale Moore, WR, Purdue (R-Soph, 5′ 7″, 181 pounds)
Moore has electrifying tape. His size will force him exclusively into a slot-receiver role at the next level, but his 4.31 40-time will keep him in the NFL for a long time. Teams have to find a way to get the ball in his hands often as he’s a homerun threat whenever he has possession. He’s quick and fast with an absurd 42 1/2” vertical jump at his Pro Day. He might be the best raw athlete in this draft and I think he has All-Pro upside. 
(Overall #31)

6. Elijah Moore, WR, Ole Miss (Jr, 5′ 9″, 178 pounds)
Moore is a shifty receiver that lacks the size to win at the line of scrimmage so team’s will have to scheme him free releases either out of the backfield or in motion at the snap. He can certainly be a home run threat with 4.35 40-speed. His athletic upside makes up for the work he needs to develop into an NFL level wide receiver. Find a way to get the ball in his hands as a rookie and worry about the route running and receiving skills later. 
(Overall #34)

7. Kadarius Toney, WR, Florida (Sr, 5′ 11″, 193 pounds)
Kadarius Toney has off-field red flags stemming from an incident relating to an air-soft gun he owned that resembled an AR-15 assault rifle. He also has some injury history with two separate shoulder injuries and some shin issues as well. On the field, Toney was used as a weapon more than a receiver. His route running and ball skills need work, but he’s dangerous with the ball in the open field. He’ll make an immediate impact as a kick returner, with thee potential to develop into a quality NFL receiver. It might just be the college uniform, but he’s got a little Percy Harvin to his game. 
(Overall #44)

8. Terrace Marshall Jr, WR, LSU (Sr, 6′ 2″, 205 pounds)
Marshall had a knack for quitting on plays that he wasn’t involved in that jumped out on film. He’s got prototypical size for an NFL receiver. He was productive on the 2019 LSU title team with 13 TDs and also scored 10 TDs in just 7 games this season before opting out. It’s worth noting he opted out prior to a potential showcase game with Alabama this season. He can drop uncontested catches due to a lack of concentration at times. His interviews with teams needed to be great or I could see him falling into day three. He ran a 4.4 40 at his pro day which should see him taken by the early second round given his size, but he’ll need to learn how to separate from NFL defensive backs. 
(Overall #62)

9. Nico Collins, WR, Michigan (Sr, 6′ 4″, 215 pounds)
Nico Collins is a tough player to evaluate. He opted our of his senior season after falling victim to subpar quarterback play throughout his career at Michigan. Collins is a big bodied, old-school outside receiver. He’s strong and more than capable of making contested catches. He’ll be a weapon in the red zone, but runs well enough to be a deep route threat on the outside. His collefe production feels incomplete given what his tape shows. He’s faster than he is quick, but should fit into an NFL receiving core as a dependable possession receiver with solid #2 upside. 
(Overall #65)

10. Dyami Brown, WR, North Carolina (Jr, 6′ 0″, 189 pounds)
Brown is a fluid athlete, but had 15 drops over his last two years. He loses focus at times and lacked the consistency of a first-round prospect despite his production over the last two season.  He runs well and can take the top off a defense. He’s got solid upside as his football IQ expands and he matures as a player. He has all the physical tools to be a long-time starting NFL receiver if he gets comfortable playing through contact and keeps his head in games. 
(Overall #68)

11. Amon-Ra St. Brown, WR, USC (Jr, 5′ 11″, 197 pounds)
His last name should be familiar to NFL fans after his brother Equanimeous was drafted by the Packers in 2018. He also has another older brother who played receiver at Stanford. Amon-Ra isn’t the biggest prospect and didn’t run particularly well at his Pro Day. St. Brown is a polished prospect and will be able to contribute in the NFL, but his speed and athleticism cap his potential at a quality #2 receiver at best. 
(Overall #71)

12. Amari Rodgers, WR, Clemson (Sr, 5′ 9″, 212 pounds)
Rodgers had a breakout senior season as the primary target for Trevor Lawrence. He’s short, but carries enough weight in his frame to stay on the field at the next level. His route running is crisp and he’s got strong hands to make tough catches. His size will keep him in the slot, but he’s a tough, competitive player that will find a way to contribute both on offense and in special teams. 
(Overall #75)

13. Tylan Wallace, WR, Oklahoma State (Sr, 5′ 11″, 194 pounds)
Wallace runs like a bowling ball after the catch. He’s big and physical despite his smaller frame. He’s a mechanic in his route running and finds ways to get open despite lacking plus size or speed. He can high-point the ball and make contested catches. He’s a tough player, but battled injuries including a torn ACL in 2019. His medical evaluation will be key, but he has all the qualities you want in a starting NFL receiver. 
(Overall #80)

14. Tutu Atwell, WR, Louisville (Jr, 5′ 8″, 155 pounds)
Atwell is small, even beyond NFL standards. You simply don’t see guys in the NFL weighing under 160 pounds. He’s the fastest receiver in this class running a 4.35 40 at his Pro Day. He’ll take the top off a defense, but his size will keep him away from the middle of the field, because he’s simply not built to withstand NFL hits. His speed will allow him to contribute as long as he can stay on the field. His ability to out run everyone will determine how long he can stay on the field. His drops and foot injuries are concerns, but his speed is too fast to pass up on day two. 
(Overall #85)

15. D’Wayne Eskridge, WR, Western Michigan (R-Sr, 5′ 8″, 190 pounds)
Eskridge is a burner. He ran a 4.39 40 and presents immediate calure as a kick-returner in the NFL. He’s under-sized but a solid pass catcher who will contribute in special teams and can contribute in 3 and 4-wide sets at the next level. He reminds me of John Brown with his athleticism, but his size will keep him from becoming a #2 WR. 
(Overall #91)

16. Cade Johnson, WR, South Dakota State (R-Sr, 5′ 10″, 184 pounds)
Cade Johnson was another FCS victim with his senior season postponed until the Spring forcing him to miss his final season to enter the NFL Draft. Fortunately, he was able to compete in the Senior Bowl where he put on a show in one-on-ones. He’s a Wes Welker type possession receiver that’s stocky and willing to go across the middle. He’d fit perfectly in the Patriots system with his knack to get open underneath and pick up the tough yards after the catch. He had fumble issues at SDSU which will remain a concern against NFL physicality. 
(Overall #94)

Tight Ends – 

1. Kyle Pitts, TE, Florida (Jr, 6′ 5″, 245 pounds)
Pitts is a freak. He’s massive, but ran a 4.4 40-yard dash. He’s the best pass catcher in this draft. He’s quick and twitchy in addition to having elite straight-line speed. He’s in the same mold of a Travis Kelcee, but might even be a better athlete. If not accounting for positional value, he’d be my clear #1 player in this draft. Assuming he stays healthy, he’s a future All-Pro and would be the front-runner of OROY if QBs weren’t eligible.  
(Overall #3)

2. Pat Freiermuth, TE, Penn State (Jr, 6′ 5″, 251 pounds)
Freiermuth is your more traditional tight-end in that his speed matches his frame much. He’s an ok blocker at initial contact, but he struggles to stay engaged in blocks or seal off defenders on run plays to his side. He’s athletic and big enough to improve as a blocker and develop into a Pro Bowl caliber player, but should make an instant impact as a hand in the dirt receiver. 
(Overall #35)

3. Brevin Jordan, TE, Miami (FL) (Jr, 6′ 2″, 247 pounds)
Jordan is built more like a thick receiver than a tradition tight end. He’s not a blocker, but he’ll fit in well as the #2 tight end in 12 personnel sets. He missed at least one game with an injury in all three seasons at Miami so durability has to be a concern. He runs well enough at game speed to separate from certain linebackers, but his lack of height makes him a good defensive match-up for any NFL safety. 
(Overall #95)

4. Tommy Tremble, TE, Notre Dame (R-Soph, 6′ 3″, 241 pounds)
Tremble is a fullback/TE prospect. He’s the best blocker in this class, but wasn’t ever a primary receiving threat at Notre Dame. He improved as a red zone threat in his final season, but his physical playing style and athleticism will keep him in the NFL for a long time as a special-teamer. He could become a Pro Bowl fullback in the right system, but he’s not a true tight end for team’s that use their ends for in-line blocking. 
(Overall #97)

Offensive Tackles-

1. Penei Sewell, OT, Oregon (Jr, 6′ 4″, 331 pounds)
Sewell stands alone in a deep and talented class of offensive tackle prospects. Sewell is already at his ideal NFL playing size and plays with tremendous athleticism. Within Oregon’s offense he was asked to do a lot with his feet to get into space, but also has great technique in pass protection. His drop step is smooth and he plays with good balance. He doesn’t have the long arms you’d like from a tackle, but he’s mobile enough to stay at tackle and thrive as he gains a better understanding of his angles, timing, and leverage.  
(Overall #7)

2. Rashawn Slater, OT, Northwestern (Jr, 6′ 4″, 331 pounds)
Slater could play anywhere on an NFL offensive line, especially in a zone scheme. He’s a fluid athlete and played both RT and LT at Northwestern. He has a great understanding of the game and his footwork and technique are NFL ready as a rookie. I think he’ll be a long-term starting LT in the NFL with Pro Bowl potential.  
(Overall #13)

3. Teven Jenkins, OT, Oklahoma State (R-Sr, 6′ 5″, 317 pounds)
Jenkins plays with an edge, but needs to improve his foot speed to cover all the ground he’ll be asked to as an NFL tackle. His technique is good when he’s right, but he gets sloppy later in games. He has an extremely strong upper body and could rag doll undersized pass rushers at the collegiate level, but won’t have that same luxury against NFL rushers. His upside is massive given his physical traits and playing style. 
(Overall #18)

4. Christian Darrisaw, OT, Virginia Tech (Jr, 6′ 4″, 322 pounds)
Darrisaw is a physical blocker with solid footwork and technique. He tends to play a little too up-right in pass protection and he might be better suited for a move into guard long term. He doesn’t finish his blocks like the prospects ranked ahead of him and needs to develop that mean streak to reach his full potential in the NFL because the physical tools are there. 
(Overall #24)

5. Samuel Cosmi, OT, Texas (R-Jr, 6′ 5″, 314 pounds)
Cosmi is a talented run blocker, with solid footwork and technique to make up for his lack of size and strength. He’s probably better suited to move inside, but if he can add size, he’ll be a long-time OT in the NFL.  He improved each year at Texas and is more polished than more OL prospects entering this year’s draft. 
(Overall #37)

6. Brady Christensen, OT, BYU (R-Jr, 6′ 5″, 302 pounds)
Christensen will be 25 before his first NFL bye-week which might scare some NFL teams off of him. He’s a quick athlete for his size and has great bend with fluid hips. He loves to run block and is capable of pulling. He’s comfortable blocking in an RPO scheme which is becoming more common in the NFL. He needs to improve his timing, but he’s an NFL sized player who’s shown enough to project as a starting NFL OT. 
(Overall #51)

7. Liam Eichenberg, OT, Notre Dame (R-Sr, 6′ 6″, 306 pounds)
Eichenberg explodes into his drops on pass protections and moves fluidly. He lacks the upper body strength to physically dominate edge rushers, but his technique keeps clean pockets. He’s not as long or big as you’d like from an NFL OT and will be better suited for a move inside to guard at the NFL level.    
(Overall #54)

8. Spencer Brown, OT, Northern Iowa (R-Sr, 6′ 8″, 311 pounds)
Spencer Brown is a brawler with a massive frame that will benefit from an NFL strength program. He’s got the size to be a Pro Bowl caliber OT. His footwork is great for his size and he gets good leverage despite his height. He played exclusively RT at Northern Iowa and at 6’8” his heigh might scare some teams with shorter quarterbacks away. He’s a project, but if you trust your coaching staff he’s very much worth taking. 
(Overall #60)

9. D’Ante Smith, OT, East Carolina (R-Sr, 6′ 5″, 305 pounds)
D’Ante Smith plays with good bend and flexibility. His technique is raw, but his athleticism gives him a lot of upside. He plays with enough balance to hold up against power rushes, but als has the quickness to stay in front of speed rushers. Smith played well against top competition at the Senior Bowl showing that his raw talent and experience will allow him to earn a roster spot and potential start on an NFL offensive line as a rookie at guard. 
(Overall #69)

10. Dillon Radunz, OT, NDSU R-Sr, 6′ 5″, 301 pounds)
Radunz has a tendency to light guys up which is good when it works, but leaves him off balance too often at the point of attack. He can get reckless in pursuit of his blocking assignments. This will lead to some high lights, but also allow savvy defensive lineman to gain inside leverage when Radunz gets over confident. Radunz needs some refinement and perhaps humility from facing NFL talent in order to improve his football IQ enough to start in the NFL. He’s got the right mentality, but needs to be reined in to not get exposed at the next level. He’s also built for a move inside.
(Overall #72)

11. Walker Little, OT, Stanford (R-Jr, 6′ 7″, 313 pounds)
Little arrived at the offensive lineman factory that is Stanford as a 5-start OT prospect. Injusries prevented him from building off a strong sophomore season and he opted out of this season meaning his last football game was in August of 2019. His durability and timing issues are concerns and his tape is old. His medical evaluation will be critical, but his pedigree will keep NFL teams interested. With his height, he can become an NFL OT through a quality strength program with plenty of frame to add weight to. He’s a high-upside boom or bust prospect who will benefit from preseason games but won’t be ready to start as a rookie. 
(Overall #81)

12. James Hudson, OT, Cincinnati (R-Jr, 6′ 4″, 313 pounds)
After redshirting and transferring from Michigan, Hudson only played in 14 collegiate games, with 11 career starts all at LT for Cincinnati. Hudson helped up well at the Senior Bowl, but his lack of experience is evident in his technique. He’s got the physical traits to develop into a starting NFL left tackle, but he needs a lot of coaching and would benefit from a redshirt year during his rookie season.    
(Overall #87)

Offensive Guards – 

1. Alijah Vera-Tucker, OG, USC (R-Jr, 6′ 4″, 308 pounds)
Vera-Tucker has the potential to play as a swing tackle, but has a higher upside at guard. He’s not the smoothest mover, but he plays with great balance and power from his base. He’s a hand puncher, but can get pushed back by bigger opposition. He works through his protection assignments quickly and didn’t have any glaring assignment misses in his tape for his final season. He’s a safe pick with Pro Bowl upside at guard.  
(Overall #22)

2. Landon Dickerson, OG, Alabama (R-Sr, 6′ 5″, 333 pounds)
Dickerson suffered season ending injuries (ACL, and both ankles) in each of his first three collegiate seasons at Florida State before transferring to Alabama for his final two seasons. Dickerson has at least one start at all 5 positions on the offensive line, but he’s best suited for guard or center at the NFL level. He has All-Pro potential and his medical evaluations are the biggest question mark for me. He’s got a high football IQ and plays with great technique. He’s ready to start as a rookie and if he’s healthy he’s the best interior offensive line prospect in this draft. 
(Overall #27)

3. Alex Leatherwood, OG, Alabama (Sr, 6′ 4″, 312 pounds)
Leatherwood started his career at RG before moving to LT for his final two collegiate seasons. He has the maturity and body to be a day 1 NFL starter. He’s better suited for guard at the next level. He’s consistent and mechanical in his blocking and won’t lose any one-on-ones by getting sloppy. He could potentially stay at tackle as well given his experience and footspeed, but he’ll find a way to start early and stay there.     
(Overall #30)

4. Jalen Mayfield, OG, Michigan (Jr, 6′ 5″, 326 pounds)
Mayfield is relatively raw with only 18 games played, all at RT in college. Mayfield has shorter arms that make him better suited to move inside. Mayfield is strong with his hands as a run blocker and smooth in his pass sets. He moves fluidly, but doesn’t have the quickest feet. He won’t be athletically dominant against NFL competition, but has the physical tools to be a long-time starter. 
(Overall #50)

5. Trey Smith, OG, Tennessee (Sr, 6′ 5″, 321 pounds)
Smith battled blood clots in his lungs during his sophomore season so his medical evaluations might remove him from some team’s boards, which is a shame because I think he’s a potential steal. He started at LG each of the past two seasons after beginning his career at LT. Smith’s issues are all mental. He’s not consistently dialed in, missing assignments throughout his film. He also can play overly aggressive at times, taking him out of position. When he’s playing the right way, he’s a Pro Bowl caliber player, but when his head isn’t in the game, it shows. He needs an offensive line room and coaching staff that can hold him accountable because he’s talented enough to be a star.     
(Overall #55)

6. Wyatt Davis, OG, Ohio State (R-Jr, 6′ 3″, 315 pounds)
Davis is a true guard prospect who started at RG throughout his time in Columbus. Davis needs to improve his consistency, but when he’s on he’s a monster. He’s more than capable of being a long-term NFL starter due to his strength. He needs some refinement in his technique and sometimes sought blocks that took him out of position. He can develop into an long-term starter, but he’s not a sure thing right now.     
(Overall #66)

7. Aaron Banks, OG, Notre Dame (R-Jr, 6′ 5″, 325 pounds)
Banks lost his fair share of hand fights when dropping into pass protection, but you can tell he loves to block. He shines as a run blocker who gets downfield quickly and looks for work. He needs to improve his balance to take advantage of his massive size in the NFL because too often he was lying on the ground after making initial contact on run plays. He’s not the most fluid athlete, but his strength and frame should allow him to blossom into a starting NFL guard.    
(Overall #76)

8. David Moore, OG, Grambling State (R-Sr, 6′ 1″, 330 pounds)
Moore is a thick-bodied, strong-handed force on the inside. He can play guard and center and moves well enough to pull as a run blocker, although it’s not a strength. He will need to get into better shape to stay on the field at the next level. His footwork and hand placement also need work, but I just love the way he plays. He’s a nasty blocker without being careless or picking up dumb penalties. He’s certainly worth taking as a long-term project.     
(Overall #86)

9. Deonte Brown, OG, Alabama (R-Sr, 6′ 3” 344 pounds)
“Violated team rules” leading to a six-game suspension at Alabama. Brown is top-heavy and can play too upright at times. He’s not quick or nimble and struggles to recover against defensive lineman with good initial burst. Beyond the character concerns from the suspension, Brown battled weight issues early at Alabama so he may need more attention than other rookies to maximize his potential. He has the ability to stay in the NFL for a long time despite some question marks, but lacks Pro Bowl upside due to his limited athleticism.   
(Overall #96)

10. Jackson Carman, OG, Clemson (Jr, 6′ 4″, 317 pounds)
Carman is a raw prospect despite amassing 27 starts at LT for Clemson. He’s a physical specimen that will benefit from moving to guard, but he needs a lot of work on his technique in pass protection. He got away with bad footwork and hand placement due to his size advantage in college, but will get exposed by NFL pass rushers without proper coaching. He’s a project who won’t start right away, but is physically prepared for the NFL.    
(Overall #98)

Centers – 

1. Creed Humphrey, OC, Oklahoma (R-Jr, 6′ 4″, 302 pounds)
Humphrey is strong and technically sound as a blocker. He has 37 starts at center under his belt and was the back-to-back Big 12 Offensive Lineman of the year. Humphrey reacts quickly to the play in front of him and shows all the traits of a future franchise center. He has the ability to play guard as well and his polished technique will earn him a starting role as a rookie. 
(Overall #43)

2. Josh Myers, OC, Ohio State (R-Jr, 6′ 5″, 310 pounds)
Myers started 21 games at center in three seasons at Ohio State. He could’ve improved his draft stock with another season of work, but he’s a tough football player that knows his role and executes it. He’s a high-IQ player, but lacks the athleticism to be a future Pro Bowler. He’s already close to his ceiling and should have a strong chance to start as a rookie.   
(Overall #52)

3. Quinn Meinerz, OC, Wisconsin-Whitewater (Sr, 6′ 2″, 320 pounds)
Meinerz plays bigger than his listed height and he’s well filled in with more room to grow in an NFL strength program. He overmatched Division III competition with his size and athleticism. Against stiff competition at the Senior Bowl he held his own. He has great technique and is physically built to succeed in the NFL, he just needs more time to adapt to NFL competition than his Division I counterparts. He started all his college games at LG, but will be better suited at center given his height and frame.   
(Overall #74)

Edge Rushers – 

1. Jaelan Phillips, Edge, Miami (FL) (R-Jr, 6′ 5″, 260 pounds)
Phillips jumps out on tape because of his big frame and athleticism. After transferring from UCLA, he broke out in his one season on the field with Miami leading the tram with 15.5 TFL and 8.0 sacks. He suffered several concussions at UCLA and was never cleared to return by UCLA’s doctors leading to his transfer. His medical evaluations might remove him from some draft boards, but in terms of on-field production and physical upside he’s the most NFL ready prospect. 
(Overall #11)

2. Kwity Paye, Edge, Michigan (Sr, 6′ 2″, 261 pounds)
Paye is built like a stand-up 3-4 linebacker, but at Michigan was asked almost exclusively to get into the backfield which he was elite at doing. He’s a physical freak and extremely quick to get around the edge or fill his rush lane on stunts and twists. Paye needs to develop a repertoire of pass-rush moves at the next level, but he’s got all the traits to develop into a Pro Bowl caliber edge rusher. Paye works too hard and has developed enough in college to prove he’ll find a way to succeed at the next level.  
(Overall #14)

3. Gregory Rousseau, Edge, Miami (FL) (R-Soph, 6′ 6″, 266 pounds)
Rousseau is a mountain coming from the edge at 6’6’’ with plenty of room on his frame to add weight without reducing his athleticism. Physically he’s got the highest upside, but he’s extremely raw with just 15 college games and only 7 starts at Miami after opting out of the 2020 season. Rousseau has the highest ceiling in this draft class which is why I’m grading him so high. He has the traits of a future All-Pro, but will need to develop a consistent set of pass rush moves to capitalize on his physical gifts.   
(Overall #23)

4. Azeez Ojulari, Edge, Georgia (R-Soph, 6′ 2″, 249 pounds)
Ojulari checks all the boxes off the field and is reported to be a humble, hardworking guy.  He has the ability to stand up and drop into coverage as a plus athlete, but also understands the best pass rushing route to thee quarterback. At times got overwhelmed by bigger tackles and will need to develop counter moves to win consistently on pass rushes at the next level. He’s a high-ceiling prospect, but not a sure thing like the top pass rush prospects in recent drafts.  
(Overall #32)

5. Joe Tryon, Edge, Washington (R-Jr, 6′ 5″, 259 pounds)
Tyron is a smart, instinctive football player. He makes the play that’s there for him and doesn’t over pursue on his pass rushes to take himself out of the action. He knows when to drop into the flats and reads the play before it happens. He has a knack for getting to the quarterback with several pass rush moves already in his toolbox. I think he’s more NFL-ready than some of the higher-upside prospects in this position group
(Overall #38)

6. Joseph Ossai, Edge, Texas (Jr, 6′ 3″, 256 pounds)
Ossai works as hard as anyone on his film. He chases down the ball carrier anywhere on the field. He fills his rush lanes with aggression and has big and strong hands to move blockers out of his way. His effort will help him stay in the NFL, but he needs to better understand his role and the plays happening around him to better convert his effort into significant production at the next level.    
(Overall #45)

7. Jayson Oweh, Edge, Penn State (R-Soph, 6′ 4″, 257 pounds)
Oweh is big and strong in a way that jumps out on tape. He’s extremely fast clocking a 4.37 40-yd dash at his pro day. Oweh is extremely raw, with just 8 college starts and only 24 games played in three college seasons. He’s a project, but has the physical tools to be a star in this league. He’s a high-ceiling player with boom-or-bust potential simply due to how raw he is. You’re drafting an athlete, not a football player with Oweh. 
(Overall #49)

8. Payton Turner, Edge, Houston (Sr, 6′ 5″, 270 pounds)
I like Turner’s tape a lot. He plays a little too tall and upright, but was productive because of his motor. He was able to overpower a lot of guys in college and will need to develop more pass rush moves to succeed in the NFL. You can’t coach the size he brings to the table and I’m inclined to bet on guys that play as hard as he does.     
(Overall #53)

9. Carlos Basham Jr., Edge, Wake Forest (R-Sr, 6′ 3″, 274 pounds)
Basham is an experienced, more filled out edge prospect. He’s thick with less need to project him physically to the next level. He was very productive for three seasons at Wake Forest. His size and quickness gives him some versatility as he can be moved to rush from the inside as necessary. He’ll contribute in the NFL, but lacks the athleticism to be anything more than an above-average starter.    
(Overall #73)

10. Ronnie Perkins, Edge, Oklahoma (Jr, 6′ 2″, 253 pounds)
Perkins is an athlete with an edge rusher’s body. He’s only slightly too big to line up as a stand up linebacker on every down, but he moves so fluidly. He ran slow at his Pro Day, but his game tape shows adequate speed. He has strong hands and a quick burst off the edge. He was very productive in his three years at Oklahoma. A failed drug test is one major red flag. He should be able to contribute right away on special teams.   
(Overall #83)

11. Dayo Odeyingbo, Edge, Vanderbilt (Sr, 6′ 5″, 285 pounds)
Odeyingbo tore his Achilles during draft prep in January which could see him fall to day three. He might be better suited for a move inside in the NFL given his frame. He plays through the whistle and jump out for how competitive he played on a bad Vandy team. Assuming he can physically get back to the player he was in college, Odeyingbo is going to find a way to stick around in this league.    
(Overall #88)

12. Rashad Weaver, Edge, Pittsburgh (R-Sr, 6′ 4″, 259 pounds)
Weaver missed the 2019 season with a torn ACL, but returned in 2020 with his best collegiate season. Weaver is a great athlete for his size and uses his instincts to make plays when he can’t get to the quarterback. He’s a smart football player with some athleticism limitations in terms of speed and quickness, but his production shows he can overcome those shortcomings. He should earn a second contract, but may never jump out in NFL games.    
(Overall #99)

13. Quincy Roche, Edge, Miami (FL) (R-Sr, 6′ 2″, 245 pounds)
Roche feasted as a transfer on a loaded Miami front four. His production throughout his college career, which started at Temple, is eye-popping. He’s slightly undersized but the tape doesn’t lie. He knows how to make plays and filled his role well with the Hurricanes. He’ll find a way onto an NFL roster and can stick around this league for a while.     
(Overall #100)

Defensive Lineman – 

1. Christian Baramore, DL, Alabama (R-Soph, 6′ 4″, 310 pounds)
Baramore was extremely productive in his final collegiate season earning All-American Honors and dominating in the national title game on his way to Defensive MVP Honors. He’s big, strong, and agile. He plays with great leverage and is more than capable of collapsing a pocket from the interior. Baramore is a bit chunky and will need to get into better shape to maximize his collegiate potential, but he’s got Pro Bowl upside.      
(Overall #15)

2. Milton Williams, DL, Louisiana Tech (R-Jr, 6′ 3″, 284 pounds)
Williams overwhelmed his competition at Louisiana Tech using his raw power and speed to produce tackles in the backfield. He plays a bit too tall at points, but runs hard and finishes plays with his speed when he’s stood up at the line of scrimmage. He’s a raw prospect, but his physical traits are appealing and he’s such an impressive athlete that will benefit from NFL coaching as well as strength and conditioning.      
(Overall #46)

3. Daviyon Nixon, DL, Iowa (R-Jr, 6′ 1″, 313 pounds)
Nixon is a great athlete and shined in his final season at Iowa. He plays aggressively and flashes violence to get off blocks. He makes plays out in space and has the ability to penetrate and collapse the pocket. Nixon’s tape doesn’t lie and his production in college can’t be questioned. He was impressive in his Pro Day and has a high ceiling with his physical tools.      
(Overall #48)

4. Levi Onwuzurkie, DL, Washington (R-Sr, 6′ 2″, 290 pounds)
Onwuzurike underwhelmed on film. He came off as too heavy and played with poor leverage often ending up on the ground prior to making a play. He battled injuries throughout his career, including one that kept him out of most Senior Bowl activities. Onwuzurike has the build to be successful, but will need to clean up his technique and better understand his gap assignments to become a consistent starter.      
(Overall #56)

5. Marlon Tuipulotu, DL, USC (R-Jr, 6′ 1″, 307 pounds)
Tuipulotu’s lacks the explosiveness and agility to become a dominant interior pass rusher, but he consistently makes the plays that are there for him. He doesn’t have the highest ceiling given his frame, but he’ll make an NFL roster because of his ability to maximize opportunities to make the play in front of him. He won’t miss tackles and when he is left unblocked he bursts to make the play every time. 
(Overall #59)

6. Jay Tufele, DL, USC (R-Jr, 6′ 2″, 305 pounds)
Tufele is stout and plays with great effort. He projects as a three-technique in the NFL. Who needs to improve his ability to get off blocks. Tufele is already a plus against the run, but needs to improve as a pass rusher to shine in the NFL. He sat out this past season and needs refinement to contribute at the next level.     
(Overall #77)

7. Bobby Brown III, DL, Texas A&M (Jr, 6′ 4″, 321 pounds)
Brown is massive and plays like it. He wins at the line of scrimmage and has a knack for collapsing the pocket. He penetrates easily, sometimes taking himself out of plays against the run. Brown isn’t yet 21 and needs refinement to develop into a starter, but he has great physical tools, but needs to improve his conditioning so that he stays on the field and avoids some focus related errors.      
(Overall #90)

Linebackers – 

1. Micah Parsons, LB, Penn State (Jr, 6′ 3″, 246 pounds)
Parsons is a phenomenal athlete that moves incredibly well for his size. He’s got a frame that can add additional weight at the next level. Parsons shows great instincts and is a true three down linebacker. Parsons has the ability to drop into coverage and can run with modern NFL tight ends. Parsons needs to improve his technique to shed blocks and can occasionally get tunnel vision and lose track of his assignments, but he has all the traits of a future All-Pro.         
(Overall #4)

2. Jeremiah Owusu-Koramoah, LB, Notre Dame (R-Jr, 6′ 1″, 221 pounds)
Owusu-Koramoah looks the part and had the production to match during the past two seasons. Owusu has the ability to play linebacker but could also move to safety or nickel. He has a lot of similarities to Isaiah Simmons from last year’s draft with his versatility. He’s still a bit raw with his approach at times and has some mental lapses, but with maturity and experience he has Pro Bowl upside.           
(Overall #16)

3. Zaven Collins, LB, Tulsa (R-Jr, 6′ 4″, 259 pounds)
Collins shows great instincts with his ability to read and react to plays. He’s capable in coverage and has a nose for the football. He’s a fluid athlete and breaks down to make tackles effortlessly. Collins doesn’t wow you with his speed or athleticism limiting his ceiling, but he’s a refined football player that is NFL ready.  
(Overall #26)

4. Nick Bolton, LB, Missouri (Jr, 5′ 11″, 237 pounds)
Bolton is a big hitter that plays a bit stiff at times. He finishes tackles and imposes his will on ball carriers. He doesn’t have great coverage skills, but moves well enough to keep up with tight ends. He has great instincts and plays hard. He’s a more traditional three-down linebacker that should also contribute on special teams.       
(Overall #33)

5. Jamin Davis, LB, Kentucky (R-Jr, 6′ 3″, 234 pounds)
Davis is strong in coverage with solid ball skills for a linebacker. He runs well and plays fast without seeming sped up. Davis isn’t a thumper, but makes physical plays when needed. He’s a good not great run defender, but has the physical tools needed to defend modern NFL schemes.       
(Overall #41)

6. Baron Browning, LB, Ohio State (Sr, 6′ 2″, 245 pounds)
Browning is an explosive athlete that runs hard and initiates contact. He was used in a variety of roles within Ohio State’s scheme and has great versatility. Browning plays fast, but at times looks sped up and out of position. His football instincts aren’t where they need to be and he needs to better understand his responsibilities within a defense to become an NFL starter.      
(Overall #63)

7. Jabril Cox, LB, LSU (R-Sr, 6′ 3″, 232 pounds)
Cox is too often around plays, but not actually the one making them. He can drop into coverage, but needs to improve his run defense. The NDSU grad transfer has the potential to be an every down linebacker because he’s a great athlete, but he needs to improve his football IQ to maximize his physical tools and stay on the field in the NFL.        
(Overall #78)

Cornerbacks – 

1. Patrick Surtain II, CB, Alabama (Jr, 6′ 2″, 208 pounds)
Surtain runs extremely well and has prototypical size for a shutdown NFL cornerback. Surtain is not an explosive athlete, but makes up for it with his technique and understanding of the game. He is always in the right spot and anticipates routes before they break. Surtain is smooth in coverage and enjoys the physicality of press-man coverage. He’s a day one starter with Pro Bowl potential.         
(Overall #8)

2. Greg Newsome II, CB, Northwestern (Jr, 6′ 0″, 192 pounds)
Newsome was the shutdown corner in an elite Northwestern secondary. He’s the fastest of the elite cornerback prospects. Newsome wasn’t asked to play much press-man coverage in college.  He’s skinnier than I’d like and will need to put on weight to handle the rigors of an NFL schedule. Newsome is ready to start in the NFL and can be a tremendous playmaker with his instincts and ability to read routes as they happen.         
(Overall #10)

3. Jaycee Horn, CB, South Carolina (Jr, 6′ 0″, 205 pounds)
Horn is physical and long. He’s a tremendous athlete who should only get better with more experience and work on his technique. He’s not as polished as Surtain, but has the higher upside because of his physical tools. He runs well in coverage and won’t get beat over the top because of any speed mismatches. He occasionally was responsible for coverage breakdowns and growing pains should be expected as he adjusts to an NFL scheme. 
(Overall #19)

4. Asante Samuel Jr, CB, Florida State (Jr, 5′ 10″, 180 pounds)
Samuel has NFL bloodlines with his father playing 11 seasons at DB in the NFL. Samuel lacks ideal size, but runs well and is a fluid athlete. At times, Samuel gets caught peaking into the backfield, but his technique in coverage is sound. Samuel shows the ability to shed blocks, but his size won’t make that easy against NFL receivers. Samuel can play both inside and outside and plays fundamentally sound enough to start in the NFL for a long time despite lacking the size you want from an outside corner.            
(Overall #39)

5. Caleb Farley, CB, Virginia Tech (R-Jr, 6′ 1″, 197 pounds)
Farley’s biggest negative is his struggles to win 50-50 balls. He’s not great once the ball is in the air, despite having the height and athleticism to make plays on the ball. He’s twitchy and runs hard in coverage, but doesn’t look fluid with his hips. He has the physical traits of a Pro Bowl cornerback, but has injury concerns leading to a microdiscectomy from a back injury leading to him being unable to workout in the lead up to the draft. He’s well-schooled coming from Bud Foster’s defense and if he can stay healthy has shutdown corner potential.            
(Overall #40)

6. Elijah Molden, CB, Washington (Sr, 5′ 9″, 192 pounds)
Molden is undersized, but doesn’t play like it. He’s a big hitter and seeks out contact. He’s got good ball skills, but doesn’t run particularly well. Molden doesn’t have the physical tools or athleticism NFL teams covet, but he makes plays and will find a way to stick around in the NFL due to his ability to force takeaways and his physicality.         
(Overall #47)

7. Eric Stokes, CB, Georgia (R-Jr, 6′ 0″, 194 pounds)
Stokes is the fastest prospect in this class clocking a 4.29 40 at his Pro Day. He plays with that speed on tape and has the physical tools and athleticism of an elite NFL cornerback. However, Stokes technique in coverage isn’t good enough and he can get lost in coverage at times. He’s late to recognize plays and will need a lot of coaching to become a consistent NFL starter, but he’s a project worth investing in due to the abundance of elite tools he brings to the table.          
(Overall #57)

8. Ifeatu Melifonwu, CB, Syracuse (R-Jr, 6′ 2″, 205 pounds)
Melifonwu is a big bodied corner that covers a lot of ground with his long stride. Melifonwu struggles with sudden change of direction and reacts to plays more often than anticipating what’s coming. I love his upside due to his size and athleticism, but will struggle to cover quicker receivers who can exploit his footwork with sudden changes in direction.         
(Overall #58)

9.  Paulson Adebo, CB, Stanford (R-Jr, 6′ 1″, 198 pounds)
Adebo has NFL size and is a plus athlete. He understands the game well and plays with great instincts. He isn’t particularly fluid in his movement and can’t get beat by double moves and quality route runners. He’s a strong tackler, but feels closer to a finished product than other prospects. He can get turned around in coverage, but his technique with the ball in the air is solid. He’s not a shutdown corner, but he has the potential to be a starter in the NFL.            
(Overall #64)

10. Tyson Campbell, CB, Georgia (Jr, 6′ 1″, 193 pounds)
Campbell is another project. He’s got great physical tools and runs extremely well, but was unproductive in college with just one career interception in 33 games played including 24 starts.   Campbell is another boom or bust guy. He’s extremely raw, but should be able to contribute on special teams immediately at the very least.        
(Overall #79)

11. Kelvin Joseph, CB, Kentucky (R-Soph, 5′ 11″, 197 pounds)
Joseph lacks football instincts you’d like from a cornerback. He’s needs to improve as a tackler and show more of a willingness to involve himself in plays where he’s not targeted. Joseph only started 9 games in college and played in just 20 so he is an extremely raw prospect. He’s got the physical tools to cover any receiver, but he’s a boom-or-bust prospect that could struggle to adjust to NFL competition where he won’t just be able to get by on athleticism.          
(Overall #82)

12. Aaron Robinson, CB, UCF (R-Sr, 5′ 11″, 186 pounds)
Robinson needs to improve his discipline to match his physicality to more quality play. Robinson is slow to react and doesn’t see the game well. He’s tough and will line up inside and outside, although he’s likely best suited for nickel in the NFL.     
(Overall #89)

Safeties – 

1. Trevon Moehrig, S, TCU (Jr, 6′ 0″, 202 pounds)
Moehrig has great instincts and plays fast. He’s willing to deliver big hits and seeks contact. He’s a violent thumper, but also can make plays in coverage. He’s got good size and moves well in coverage. Moehrig has a Pro Bowl ceiling and will thrive on special teams as well. He’s a really solid football player that’s ready for the next level.          
(Overall #20)

2. Richie Grant, S, UCF (R-Sr, 5′ 11″, 197 pounds)
Grant is the top safety in a weak class. He’s a ball hawk that was extremely productive at UCF. He’s a good, but not great athlete who will turn 24 during his rookie season. Grant would also benefit from filling out more in order to stay on the field throughout his career. He doesn’t have a Pro Bowl ceiling, but should develop into a solid NFL starter.          
(Overall #42)

3. Jevon Holland, S, Oregon (Jr, 6′ 0″, 207 pounds)
Holland runs well in coverage and seeks out the football. He reads the ball in the air and knows how to make plays when given the opportunity. Holland has upside as a kick and punt returner as well. He’s a competitor and will fit well as a nickel safety who can be deployed in a variety of ways depending on opposing personnel.        
(Overall #70)

4. Hamsah Nasirildeen, S, Florida State (Sr, 6′ 3″, 215 pounds)
Nasirildeen is a big safety, but plays with more finesse than physicality. Nasirildeen never was able to build off a strong junior year after tearing his ACL in the season finale. He didn’t run during his Pro Day due to a hamstring strain. He’s got a lot of traits you’d like out of a box safety but needs a defined role within a defense to better understand the game and how he can contribute.  
(Overall #84)

Specialists:
1. Evan McPherson, K, Florida (5th-6th)
2. Jose Borregales, K, Miami (FL) (6th-7th)
3. Blake Haubeil, K, Ohio State (7th)
4. Riley Patterson, K, Memphis (UDFA)
5. Alex Kessman, K, Pittsburgh (UDFA)

1. Max Duffy, P, Kentucky (5th-6th)
2. Drue Chrisman P, Ohio State (5th-6th)
3. James Smith, P, Cincinnati, (6th-7th)
4. Oscar Bradburn, P, Virginia Tech (UDFA)
5. Pressley Harvin, P, Georgia Tech (UDFA)

1. Thomas Fletcher, LS, Alabama (7th)
2. Camaron Cheeseman, LS, Michigan (UDFA)
3. Turner Bernard, LS, SDSU (UDFA)
4. Ryan Langan, LS, Georgia Southern (UDFA)
5. Colten Menges, LS, Alcorn State (UDFA)

2020 Starting QB Power Rankings

BY:DALTON

I typed out this list in a group chat so I don’t want it to go to waste and will post it here. This is assuming each QB is healthy and I will separate by tiers.

TIER 1:

  1. Patrick Mahomes- Chiefs

TIER 2:

2. Lamar Jackson- Ravens

3. Dashaun Watson- Texans

4. Russel Wilson- Seahawks

TIER 3:

5. Drew Brees- Saints

6. Dak Prescott- Cowboys

7. Matthew Stafford- Lions

8. Carson Wentz- Eagles

TIER 4:

9. Matt Ryan- Falcons

10. Cam Newton- Patriots

11. Jimmy Garoppolo- 49er’s

12. Aaron Rodgers- Packers

13. Tom Brady- Buccaneers

14. Ben Roethlisberger- Steelers

15. Kirk Cousins- Vikings

16. Kyler Murray- Cardinals

TIER 5:

17. Phil Rivers- Colts

18. Ryan Tannehill- Titans

19. Josh Allen- Bills

20. Baker Mayfield- Browns

21. Jarred Goff- Rams

22. Joe Burrow- Bengals

23. Derek Carr- Raiders

24. Teddy Bridgewater- Panthers

TIER 6:

25. Gardner Minshew- Jaguars

26. Drew Lock- Broncos

27. Daniel Jones- Giants

28. Sam Darnold- Jets

29. Tua Tagovailoa- Dolphins

TIER 7:

30. Justin Herbert- Chargers

31. Mitch Trubisky- Bears

32. Dwayne Haskins- Washington

 

JBDC 2020 NFL Mock Draft 1.0

BY: DALTON

 

The first round of the NFL will be held on Thursday, April 23rd.

Pick 1- Cincinnati Bengals- Joe Burrow- QB

Lets not overthink this one too much, folks. Burrow is the best QB in the class this year all things considered. Cincy needs a QB and it just so happens that the guy who had the best individual season in NCAA history is available.

Pick 2- Washington Redskins- Chase Young- EDGE

Ron Rivera wants to 1) give Haskins a test run because it buys him another year in the event that Haskins is a bust and 2) as a defensive minded coach, drafting the best overall prospect who happens to be a defender is too sweet for the new DC Coach to pass up.

Pick 3- Miami Dolphins (Trade w/ Detroit)- Tua Tagovailoa- QB

Rather than gambling that other QB needy teams jump into this spot, the Dolphins make their move and get their quarterback of the future. They send Detroit the 5th and 26th (from Houston) overall picks along with a Day 2 and Day 3 pick. If they truly believe that Tua can be “that guy”, this is a win-win trade for both sides.

Pick 4- New York Giants- Isaiah Simmons- LB

Many other pundits believe that the Giants are going to go offensive line here, but I see Simmons as the guy who garners a lot of hype leading up to April 23rd. He covers the field like a safety and can bang at the line like a traditional linebacker. The Giants do need help everywhere and a prospect as versatile as Simmons could fill a lot of gaps.

Pick 5- Detroit Lions (Trade w/ Miami)- Jeff Okudah- CB

The Lions gain extra draft capital and still get their man. Judging by all their offseason moves, they are locked in on Okudah. He won’t be Darius Slay right out of the gate but he has all the tools to become a CB1 on any team in the league.

Pick 6- Los Angles Chargers- Justin Herbert- QB

A Chargers insider has indicated to me that they are locking in on the Oregon QB. While he’s not Tua; 32 touchdowns, 6 interceptions, and almost 3,500 yards in his senior season is nothing to be upset about. He is the heir apparent to the Rivers throne but L.A. will be content with sitting him and letting Tyrod “The Toolman” Taylor take the reins for a year.

Pick 7- Carolina Panthers- Tristan Wirfs- OL

You can never have too many good offensive lineman and Wirfs is the first off the board. Carolina will have their pick between him, Wills, and Becton. I feel they take an OL and, personally, I think Wirfs is the best of those three but any of them is an instant plug-and-play starter.

Pick 8- Arizona Cardinals- Mekhi Becton- OL

The Cardinals continue to invest on offense after their steal of a trade for DeAndre Hopkins. Becton, like I said in the pick above, is one of three top offensive lineman in this draft. Not as sexy as the Hopkins trade, but it makes everything better on offense. You would have to imagine that Cardinal fans from Phoenix to Chicago and everywhere in-between will have dreams of an explosive offense.

Pick 9- Jacksonville Jaguars-  Derrick Brown- DL

After dealing Calais Campbell to the Ravens, the Jags need to fill in that defensive line. While there were questions about Brown’s athleticism after the combine, the tape speaks for itself. He was a beast at Auburn and can potentially turn the Jags back into “Sacks-onville”

Pick 10- Cleveland Browns- Jedrick Wills Jr- OL

Cleveland was 22nd in both offensive and defensive efficiency last year but their major investments are on the offensive side of the ball so they are going to take the third offensive lineman in the last four picks. This is a make or break year for Baker Mayfield, if he can’t get it done with all those skill players and an improved offensive line, it may be time for another rebuild.

Pick 11- New York Jets- Jerry Jeudy- WR

Adam Gase, supposed quarterback whisperer, gets the best available weapon for young QB Sam Darnold. I absolutely love Jeudy as a prospect and think he could be the biggest “star” of this entire draft. I feel like this is a steal for the Jets.

Pick 12- Las Vegas Raiders- Javon Kinlaw- DL

The Raiders were dead last in the NFL in defensive efficiency. Kinlaw is the best defender available. The 6’5”, 320 lbs Gamecock is a physical specimen and shined in the Senior Bowl 1-on-1 drills. He has the potential to be an absolute game changer.

Pick 13- San Francisco 49ers (from Indianapolis)- CeeDee Lamb- WR

As one of many teams with multiple first round picks, the 49ers splurge on Lamb. Obviously, the 49ers don’t have many holes to fill coming off of a Super Bowl run and retaining all but a couple pieces. CeeDee was unstoppable as the main target at Clemson, there’s no reason he can’t make an immediate impact on a team that already has a budding star in Deebo Samuel.

Pick 14- Tampa Bay Buccaneers- Andrew Thomas- OL

Tampa invests in its line to protect new free agent acquisition Tom Brady (formerly of New England). Thomas is a big body (6’5, 320 lbs) and acted that way at Georgia. He mauled people then and, while he won’t necessarily be able to do the same in the NFL, he should still be a brick wall on the line.

Pick 15- Denver Broncos- Henry Ruggs III- WR

It appears that the Denver Broncos are going to make Drew Locke the quarterback of the future. They give him the 3rd best receiver in this draft. Ruggs has the speed to take underneath routes a long way and take the top off of a defense.

Pick 16- Atlanta Falcons- Patrick Queen- LB

A prototypical linebacker for today’s NFL. His speed allows him to cover linebackers and his strength allows him to engage at the line of scrimmage. Should be a day one starter and an excellent pick for the Falcons halfway through the first round.

Pick 17- Dallas Cowboys- CJ Henderson- CB

The Cowboys brought back basically everyone on offense so their focus here should be on the other side of the ball. Henderson should be able to start in man coverage packages on day one but there is still a little left to be desired in the tackling department.

Pick 18- Miami Dolphins (from Pittsburgh)- Grant Delpit- S

Winner of the Jim Thorpe award for the best collegiate safety, Delpit is South Beach bound. Miami already got their quarterback of the future and they dip back into the SEC for their quarterback of the defense. Delpit hits hard and should be a fine starting safety for years to come.

Pick 19- Las Vegas Raiders (from Chicago)- Justin Jefferson- WR

The Raiders love first round wide receivers and it actually fits this time. They have a nice slot in Hunter Renfrow and now need the receiver and can go up and get the ball. Jefferson is exactly that. He was the big play maker at LSU and Vegas Raiders are gambling that he can be the same guy for them.

Pick 20- Jacksonville Jaguars (from LA Rams)- Trevon Diggs- CB

Diggs is physical and plays the same way. This can leave him burnt at the line sometimes but with the right coaching, he should be able to adjust to the NFL just fine. If he has trouble in the secondary, at the very least he should be an elite special teams player.

Pick 21- Philadelphia Eagles- D’Andre Swift- RB

The Eagles dont really have a running back on the roster that they can trust. Enter Swift. An extremely consistent runner who is coming from Georgia, which has slowly become Running Back U. What he had shown in college, his pedigree, and the current situation in Philly should make Swift the starter the moment he’s drafted.

Pick 22- Minnesota Vikings (from Buffalo)- Jordan Love- QB

The Vikings were looking to wait a little bit to draft Kirk Cousins successor, but with the Patriots right behind them, they jump on Jordan Love. Love has all the physical tools to become a franchise quarterback. Learning from Cousins for a year or two should benefit both Love and the Vikings.

Pick 23- New England Patriots- K’Lavon Chaisson- DL

It would surprise me if the Pats trade back here, but as of now I feel they try to stock back up on defenders after losing many pieces on defense this offseason. Chaisson has the potential to be a beast once he finishes filling out. Any player going to New England should have Pro Bowl potential.

Pick 24- New Orleans Saints- Kristian Fulton- CB

Fulton could be the biggest risk we see here in the first round. He has great size for a CB at 6’0 and 200 lbs, but lacks a little bit of speed. He definitely benefited from playing on an all-time great LSU defense but there is enough there to vault him into the first round.

Pick 25- Seattle Seahawks (Trade w/ Minnesota)- AJ Epenesa- DL

The Seahawks know that the Lions are looking for more defensive line help so they jump two spots and grab the edge rusher from Iowa. He can fit any defensive scheme because of his motor, but his fine skill will need to be tuned up if Seattle wants him to become a force on the edge.

Pick 26- Detroit Lions (Trade w/ Miami from Houston)- Tee Higgins- WR

Seeing the best defensive line prospect taken just ahead of them, Detroit looks for receiver help. This is a little bit of a luxury pick but the Lions don’t have a wide out signed past this season. At 6’4, Higgins and Golladay will cause matchup nightmares for defensive coordinators.

Pick 27- Minnesota Vikings (Trade w/ Seattle)- Denzel Mims- WR

No ones stock shot up more at the combine than Mims when he ran a scorching 4.38 40. After dealing Diggs to the Bills, the Vikings are thrilled to pick up Mims in this spot. Some have questioned his love of the game, but at the 27th pick, the Vikings are more than willing to take the risk on the 6’3 speedster.

Pick 28- Baltimore Ravens- Kenneth Murray- LB

At 6’3 240lbs and with good speed, John Harbaugh should be able to find a way to use Murray in his defense. Murray is a play maker and has a real nose for the football. He can be a bit aggressive but thats easily correctable.

Pick 29- Tennessee Titans- Austin Jackson- OL

After losing starting guard Jack Conklin, the Titans will need to fill that hole so they can keep their ground game as punishing as it was last year. He has the size (6’5, 320) to be an elite guard but is still raw in his technique. It doesn’t matter to Tennessee though, Jackson has too much upside for him to slide past them.

Pick 30- Green Bay Packers- J.K. Dobbins- RB

Aaron Rodgers isn’t getting any younger and offensive minded Matt LaFleur wants to get him all the help he can get. Dobbins might just be the best running back in the draft with his speed, size, and pass catching ability. He torched the Big Ten at Ohio State for the last few seasons and will look to continue his success in the Midwest.

Pick 31- San Francisco 49ers- Xavier McKinney- S

The knock on McKinney is that he doesn’t exceed in anything, but does everything at an acceptable. With a 49ers team coming off of a Super Bowl run where they leaned on their defense, they make a bit of a luxury pick. McKinney will boost the 49ers other play makers by being so rock solid.

Pick 32- Kansas City Chiefs- Jeff Gladney- CB

The last thing the Chiefs need is help on offense. Thats why Gladney is the pick here. I’ve seen other mocks that have him going as high as the 12th pick. He is a little small for a corner but has all the athletic tools and right mindset to be a fine starting corner in the NFL.

 

 

 

 

 

Al Riveron is Public Enemy #1

BY:DALTON

I haven’t written an angry Lions recap blog in a very long time. Probably have to go back a couple seasons but here we are. What happened on Monday night was different. This one really hurt. The Lions finally have a pretty good team and to have a game stolen from them was one of the more painful things I’ve had to do as a sports fan. I definitely cant write a coherent article about the atrocities we saw unfold in Wisconsin, but here is just little clusters of things that have been pissing me off.

  • Al Riveron
    • Since this weasel fuck has taken over Dean Blandino’s position, NFL officiating has not only gone down hill, its fell off a cliff. Never in my wildest dreams would I have thought that I would clamor for the days of Dean. Al Riveron has turned officials into babbling idiots who cant make the simplest of calls. Also, the “challenging P.I.” experiment has been embarrassing, at best. Coaches are 1-24 on P.I. challenges. That means refs are overturning P.I. calls/no-calls at a 4% rate. There have been some obvious ones too that they are not reversing because they would rather lie and be blatantly wrong than admit that they missed it. This is all on this idiot Riveron. Nobody like him, nobody respects, and nobody in the league office cares. We are in officiating hell right now and Al Riveron is nothing short of Satan.
  • Accountability
    • The most irritating part of when the refs make major mistakes that swing the outcomes of games is that nothing will happen to them. They are just out on the field next Sunday botching the same calls as they did the week before. Could you imagine if you fucked up so bad at work that the final version of your project is completely different than what people thought it would be 10 minutes ago? You’d be fired. But if you’re an NFL ref, not a big deal. Forget that these players and coaches get paid extra if they make the playoffs, win the division, etc. I know this isn’t new knowledge to even the dumbest of football fans, but maybe the officiating office needs to hear this, the average length of an NFL career is 3.3 years. These players aren’t making enough money to live the rest of their lives after 3 years. These refs, by changing the outcomes of games, are messing with peoples livelihoods. Yet, not one ounce of punishment will come down on these old men who are calling things they aren’t seeing and ruining peoples financial futures.
  • Other Teams
    • This just never happens to other teams and when it does, the NFL snaps into action instantly. Look at the Saints. It’s funny though, one bad call against another team inspires a rule change that now fucks the Lions. Refs are now not throwing flags in hopes that replay of some sort will get the call right. Ha.
  • Martha and Bob
    • I need more fire and brimstone out of Martha Firestone-Ford and Bob Quinn. I am sure that they are talking to someone in the league office about what an absolutely shitty job the officials are doing, but they need to release a public statement. Not for them or the team, but for the fans. They need to show us loyal idiots that they won’t let the NFL stomp all over us only to get a simple “shrug emoji” in return. Stick up for us, fight for us, show us that we matter to you!!!!
  • “The Lions could have done more to win”
    • For the most part, yes. Most times you can say “don’t let the refs decide the game for you” but Monday night was not one of those nights. If the Lions had scored 84 points and held the Packers to -13, then the refs wouldn’t have been able to decide the game. But in a league where most games are decided by a score or less, you cant have the officials wiping away (in the Lions case) four huge plays. “The Lions should have made more plays to win!” What about the first Flowers “hands-to-the-face” penalty that negated a third down sack that would have forced a punt to the Lions up 9 with 9 minutes to go? Was making a clean sack and getting the ball back not a “winning play”? Or how about drawing pass interference to the Packers 20-yard line to at LEAST extend your lead to 5? Is scoring late in the 4th a winning play? Maybe forcing a field goal with 90 seconds left and giving your offense a chance to get a game winning field goal is a winning pay? It could have been had the loser and habitual liar Jeff Rice actually watched the game he was officiating. Take your “could have done better argument” and shove it up your ass.
  • Why me?
    • I seem to be asking this question quite a bit lately. Why me? Why do my football teams always disappoint me? Ive done nothing wrong. I try to be a nice person. I try to do the right thing. Yet, time after time my weekends get ruined whether the onus be on my team or the officials. It doesnt matter. Just know that every weekend of football I will get fucked at least once.

Friday Football Preview (10/4)

BY: DALTON

Iowa @ Michigan: A couple of thoughts on this game. 1) This is the turning point of Michigan’s season. If they come out and look good, the Wisconsin game will seem like a fluke and that Harbaugh has this ship back on the right course. If they come out and stink it up, then the season is wasted and Warde Manuel has to take a long hard look in the mirror on what he wants Michigan football’s legacy to be under his tenure as athletic director. 2) No outcome of this game will surprise me. A close game either way or a blow out either way. Every single possible result is on the table because we’ve seen a little bit of good and a whole lot of bad out of Michigan this year. Also, I may be much higher on him than others, but I think Nate Stanley is a really really good Big Ten quarterback. He will be tough to fool defensively. It hurts me to say this, but I think Iowa wins in a close one.

Michigan State @ Ohio State: If we are being completely honest right now, Ohio State should be the number one team in the country and I dont think its particularly close. They are steamrolling any team that they share the gridiron with. Michigan State’s only chance is that the defense travels and plays the game of their lives. MSU needs to muck up this game and hope for a few short fields and that the offense executes every big opportunity it gets. What MSU cant have is a series where they cause a turnover defensively then get zero points off of it. OSU is just so good everywhere. Give me the Buckeyes in a land slide.

Lions BYE: The early bye is actually favoring the Lions this year. They have a lot of injuries that this extra week will help. The only problem is that now the Lions need to play 12 consecutive weeks. We will worry about Green Bay on next Friday’s Football Preview but for now, lets just hope everyone gets/stays healthy through the bye.

 

 

NFL Gambling Picks:

Season Record (11-9)

Since gambling is all the rage online now, here are my picks for the weekend. Spreads are courtesy of Bovada:

Baltimore (-3.5) @ Pittsburgh

Minnesota @ New York Giants (+5)

Tampa Bay @ New Orleans (-3)

Denver Broncos @ Los Angeles Chargers (-6.5)

Cleveland (+4) @ San Francisco

Re-ranking Food Mascot Fights

BY: DALTON

 

So, this tweet came along my timeline the other day and it caused quite a stir in my world. While the chart is fairly accurate, there are some issues with it. Here are my rankings of Easiest to Hardest in terms of fighting.

  1. Gerber Baby: Its a fucking baby. I could kick the shit out of 100 of them at once. Light work for me. May use this time to stretch and get ready for tougher opponents
  2. Keebler Elf: Idk if elves can do magic or not, but assuming they cant this is just bizzaro world Gerber Baby. A 2 foot nothing and 11 lbs old man isn’t even gonna leave a scuff on my shoe. And if he does any damage to my clothes, one of his bitch ass sons can make me a new one for Christmas.
  3. Hamburger Helper Hand: This is the first opponent that could actually “hurt” me. If that hand latches around my throat it could give me a little scare, but I just assume its the size of a normal hand so a simple stomp should shatter its bones and life.
  4. Quaker Oats Man: He was ranked far too low. The easiest fight? That’s preposterous because at the end of the day he is a full grown man and will be significantly harder than an elf or a baby.
  5. Sugar Smacks Frog: A frog will never beat me in anything ever. There’s a chance it beats me in a “Most Like A Frog Contest” but even then I like my chances. He could smack me with his tongue, which is pretty gross, but, again, hes a frog.
  6. Jolly Green Giant: Yes, he is a giant. I am aware. But you know what he also is? Jolly. Jolly people don’t/cant fight. Mopping the floor with this green bean eating freak. I probably don’t even have to physically fight him. Just utter a little trash talk and this guy doesn’t know what to do.
  7. Lucky Charms Leprechaun: This is the first opponent where I might lose. Unlike the Keebler Elf, I know this little guy can perform magic. He could transport me to a different dimension and have me fighting in space or some shit. But, just by going off pure size, I should still be a slight favorite.
  8. Pillsbury Dough Boy: The biggest threat from the “Boy” is that he can absorb blows at an astounding rate. Kinda like that Simpsons episode where Homer is a boxer. I may punch and kick long enough that I just die of exhaustion.
  9. Yellow M&M: This dude just ate one of his own species in the latest commercial. I cant compete with that type of crazy.
  10. Bear?: I have no idea what brand this bear represents, but at the end of the day its still a bear. Me vs Bear is the first fight I go in to expecting to lose. If this bear is a black bear though, I have a very tiny chance. But if its a brown bear, plan the funeral yesterday.
  11. Chester Cheeto: This cat is flat out cool. He eats Cheetos and does drugs all day. That type of lifestyle just breeds confidence. I guess it really depends on what type of drugs Chester uses. If I had to guess, I would say that hes a crack or crystal meth guy. At that point, I would just accept my ass beating and beg for mercy.
  12. Red M&M: Remember the cannibalistic yellow one? Who do you think was the brains behind that operation?
  13. Trix Rabbit: This Rabbit will do ANYTHING to get some of that sweet sweet Trix cereal. He would dress in costumes, employ the help of Bugs Bunny, and undoubtedly whoop the ass of anyone who stands in between him and a bowl of sugary breakfast delights.
  14. KFC Colonel: The Colonel has seen some shit in his day. He may also be very tall? I’m not 100% sure but if I had to guess I would assume he is 6’4 and a lean 225. He also dresses sharp and swaggy people are tough to take down i.e. Joseph Stalin.
  15. Burger King King: Hes a king, yes. Kings do king shit. Fact! In order to claim the throne, you gotta kill a few people. I can not, nay, I WILL not get in a ring with a confirmed killer!
  16. Cap’n Crunch: Kind of a combination of the BK King and KFC Colonel. Swaggy and has killed people. Also sprinkle in some of that Lucky Charms magic because how does his cereal stay crunch in milk, Max Kellerman?!?!?
  17. Ronald McDonald: 1. Hes a clown. 2. He is THE clown. 3. How is he in such great shape while being the face of the leading corporation in the WORLD? All these facts point to one thing, he’s the hardest motherfucker out there. You cant get to the top without stepping on all the little people. I am man enough to admit that I am a little person. If I try to fight Ronnie Mac, I will just be another splotch on the bottom of his size 32 shoe.
  18. Mr. Peanut: My father was killed by a legume in a top hat/monocle/cane. My grandfather was killed by a legume in a top hat/monocle/cane. My great-grandfather was killed by a legume in a top hat/monocle/cane. My great-great-grandfather was killed by a legume in a top hat/monocle/cane. I will not fall victim to the Potocki family curse!
  19. Uncle Ben: Easiest mascot to analyze. He has straight “old man” strength. UB will beat my ass then sit me down and tell me that was because I cheated on an Accelerated Reading test in 4th grade. Not only will he physically beat me down, he will make me feel like I deserved it.
  20. Tony the Tiger: I will not sit here in the eyes of God and claim I can beat a tiger in a fight. I simply will not. No matter what the haters and losers, of which there are many, are claiming, you wont catch me stepping up to that handkerchief-ed feline.
  21. Kool-Aid Man: OH YEA this guy could kick my ass. He is an absolute unit. Mf’er breaks through walls at the drop of a phrase. Anyone who willingly smashes their face through any type of wall, is someone not to be taken lightly. He is aggressive. We can all agree that the red inside him is blood, but the real question is whos blood is it?

Friday Football Preview (9/27)

BY: DALTON

Rutgers @ Michigan: Not sure what you want me to say about Michigan football at this point that hasn’t been said on twitter dot com already. Last week was deflating. I thought they were gonna lose but the fact that Michigan wasn’t even prepared to share a stadium with the Badgers hurt. It was a sobering moment. We, as Michigan fans, need to look in the mirror and be serious about where the program is at and we may have to redefine our definition of “success”. At least, that’s where I am at. This crossroads of what I believe in and what reality is. Anyways, Michigan rolls this week because Rutgers stinks.

Indiana @ Michigan State: Honestly, I was in so much despair last Saturday that I did not watch any MSU. But, judging by the box score they did alright. Its a home game and, much like Michigan’s opponent, its Indiana. Indiana is much better than Rutgers, don’t get me wrong. They are just also a program that doesn’t know how to win. I don’t see MSU losing this game. I could see it being a frustrating day if the offense comes off the tracks though. Give me MSU by double digits.

Kansas City @ Detroit: This is the game of the weekend for Michigan natives. Two undefeated titans will battle it out for NFL supremacy. OK, well, maybe it isn’t that serious but it is a big time “prove it” game for the Lions. Mahomes is one of the greatest quarterbacks these two eyes have ever seen and on top of that they have nothing but speed on the offensive side of the ball. This is the biggest game in the Matt Patricia era and since the Lions last playoff game. It will be difficult, but there is some light at the end of the tunnel. This Chiefs defense isnt stout. Theyre giving up 6.2 ypc so the Lions should be able to play a little bit of ball control and keep that potent KC offense on the sideline. I expect it to be a one score game for most of the game but, alas, the Chiefs march towards their quest of league domination. Fear not, the Lions make a statement that they are here to compete on a week-in week-out basis. But, I’d be lying if I said in my heart of hearts I didnt have the Lions winning. Lets roll.

 

NFL Gambling Picks:

Season Record (9-6)

Since gambling is all the rage online now, here are my picks for the weekend. Spreads are courtesy of Bovada:

LA Chargers (-14.5) @ Miami

Carolina @ Houston (-4)

Seattle @ Arizona (+4)

Cowboys (-3) @ New Orleans

Browns (+7) @ Baltimore

Friday Football Preview (9/20)

BY: DALTON

Michigan @ Wisconsin: This is the first big test for the Wolverines this season. After squeaking by Army, Michigan took a bye week to try and get their offense straightened out. To me, this is the second biggest game of Harbaugh’s tenure at Michigan. That offense the first two weeks looked putrid and, honestly, it looked like Harbaugh still had a lot of influence on the play calling. Run after run after run after run. No creativity and no speed in space. But, on Saturday they can dispel all the negativity with an offensive outburst. It wont be easy considering Wisco had the number one defense in all the land, but Michigan just needs to show us an ounce of offensive creativity and I think the majority of the Michigan faithful will be back in on Gattis. Defensively, it will be interesting to see how Michigan does upfront against this Badgers’ offensive line. Wisconsin always has and always will have a great line to run behind. Stopping them and Heisman hopeful running back Johnathan Taylor will be difficult to put it lightly. I really don’t like this match-up for Michigan considering they have a speedier defensive front. The size might be too much. Unless the offense can be all that we dreamed it could be at the beginning of the season, Wisconsin might roll. I think Wisconsin defends its home field by a field goal.

 

Michigan State @ Northwestern: Oof that was a rough one last week for the Spartans. Just when everyone thought that Dantonio and the offense had figured it out, they set football back by 15 years. I really dont know if its coaching or lack of talent but something is seriously, seriously wrong on the attacking side of the ball. At this point, you have to wonder if MSU would just be better off only playing defense all game and trying to score via pick six. The defense is still as advertised. Did they give up a game winning drive to Arizona State in the final minutes of the game? Yes, but they played so strongly throughout the whole game that the levy was going to eventually break at some point. The offense did them absolutely no favors. As for Northwestern, I have no clue what kind of team they have this year. I just know that Pat Fitzgerald at home is never any easy out. Just off of recency bias for MSU and a general perception of NU, I think both Michigan based colleges take a loss on the road this week.

 

Lions @ Eagles: What a sloppy but fun win for the Lions last week! Not often do we see the Lions snatch victory from the jaws of defeat. Typically the other way around. Maybe, just maybe, the tie with Arizona was a wake up call for this team. While the game against the Chargers wasn’t the most inspiring of performances but there were a lot of positives to take from it. All that being said, I like the Lions this week against the Eagles. On paper, the Eagles are a better team. No doubt about it. But they have an injury report a mile long and this early in the season, I think it means even more when a team is injured. They say that in early season football, games are won in the 4th quarter. Which ever team makes the most plays in the final 15 minutes typically wins the game i.e. Lions vs Chargers. So with Philly having so many key players out, I am going to favor the Lions in this one. Having to rely on backups to make big plays is a dangerous game. All the Lions need to do is get a little pressure on Wentz and they can walk out of Philly unscathed.*

*record wise, any team or fan that goes to Philly is at risk of being beaten to death because they uttered the word “Detroit”.

 

NFL Gambling Picks:

Season Record (4-1)

Since gambling is all the rage online now, here are my picks for the weekend. Spreads are courtesy of Bovada:

Detroit +6 @ Philadelphia

Houston @  LA Chargers -3

LA Rams -3.5 @ Cleveland

Chicago @ Washington +4

Miami @ Dallas -23.5

 

Friday Football Preview

BY: DALTON POTOCKI

There are reasons that I missed some usually scheduled blogs the past few weeks. That reason? Work. Yea, I have a job where I make money. Not a lot of money, but enough to pay the bills. I have a free 20 minutes or so, so heres the first Friday Football Preview of 2019!

 

Michigan vs BYE: Thank god. If Michigan played Wisconsin this week, they might lose by 100. This is the perfect time for the offense to get their shit together, hold on to the ball, and actually start calling some different plays. It has been so frustrating watching this team. Yea, they are in shotgun but they still run it in between the tackles every play so has anything actually changed? The defense is fine.

Arizona State @ MSU: The Spartans might be legit this year. We all knew their defense was gonna be one of the best in the Big 10, but now they have a shot at being one of the best in the nation at the end of the season. The biggest surprise though was the offense last week. It looked pretty fresh and Lewerke showed why people were so high on him after his senior season. I expect MSU to absolutely roll this game.

Chargers @ Lions: The Lions tied, yes. But, believe it or not, there were a lot of positives to take away from the Cardinals game. The offense looked good and the play calling was balanced for 75% of the game. The “time out” drive was pretty impressive for the fact that the Lions were able to run the ball very well despite Arizona knowing they were trying to run it. The defense looked great until they took their foot off the gas. It just seemed like the errors in that game were brought on by the coaching staff and those errors are much easier to fix than having players who don’t make plays. The Chargers are pretty beat up coming into this one but Phil Rivers and his merry band of children still can move the ball up and down the field. The defense is quite good too with Bosa and Ingram on the line. If Decker cant play or plays like he did last week, it will be a long day for Stafford. All that being said, I like the Lions a lot in this spot. Big time “prove it” week for both the players and the staff.

 

 

NFL Gambling Picks:

Since gambling is all the rage online now, here are my picks for the weekend. Spreads are courtesy of Bovada:

Green Bay -3 vs Minnesota

Miami +19.5 vs New England

Lions +1.5 vs Los Angeles

Jaguars +8.5 @ Texans

Browns -7 @ Jets

 

Hope Returned

BY: DALTON

The blazing summer sun has significantly cooled and the sweeping winds bring a certain bite. But what is it exactly in the wind that you feel? Is it the changing of the seasons? Its certainly possible. With the season change comes cooler weather. But, I don’t think that’s what is giving this invisible gust its tinge. There is an energy that follows the late summer gales. From experience, that isn’t the start of school. No, this unidentifiable force is something that brings along the heights of Mt. Kilimanjaro and the depths of the Mariana Trench. This is no fleeting feeling. These winds bring something to stay. In the whirlwind of changing seasons, football stops, stays, and takes over every tangible breath.

Every new season brings the one thing that most fans lose after a couple months; hope. Maybe, just some way, there is a path for your favorite team to capture the championship. Whether it be through pure dominant force or that every other team had a slew of injuries, there is always a way. Sure, you can lie to everyone and say your team is “going through a rebuilding year” or that “if they catch a lucky break they might be able to contend”, but deep down in the pits of your soul, you’re thinking there’s a way. It’s this weird thing we do with sports. The saying goes “expect the best but prepare for the worst” and it is a mighty fine way to live life. In football though, its sort of flipped. Prepare for the worst but expect the best.

Do I know that the Lions will not win the Super Bowl this year? Yes. I do. It sucks. BUT, maybe.  What if Patricia’s defensive philosophies continue to grow and the Lions have a top 5 defense? What if Bevell is the coordinator that can finally maximize Stafford in his 10th and most important season? Hell, Kerryon Johnson was one of the best backs last year before he got hurt and in this fan’s mind that is certainly a sustainable pace. The Lions got better this off season, that’s not me just slurring my words while drunk on Honolulu Blue Kool-Aid. Sure, a lot of other teams in the NFL got better too, but that’s not fun to think about. Then I start thinking about past seasons. The Eagles came out of no where to win the Super Bowl, same thing with Ravens a few years back. I tell myself that the NFL is this weird and wacky league where anything can happen. If you come up and ask me how I think the Lions will do this year, I’ll probably tell ya 8-8 because I know that’s the right prediction. But, if you asked my soul, you may have to lock me up into an insane asylum. Hope. 

It feels like Michigan will never be able to beat Ohio State. I told myself after last year’s implosion that I’ll never get excited for Michigan football until they actually beat OSU. Then all of a sudden here comes Josh Gattis and this new offense that will be the best of all worlds. It will have big plays, tempo, ball control, and Speed in Space™. That receiving group is too good to fail. Don Brown says that he’s done some soul searching and knows what he did wrong. He is going to go to more zone and respect the speed of opposing offenses. Dax Hill is just Jabril Peppers but bigger. I mean, yea, the defensive line lost its stars, but the depth of this years team! Now there is nothing but anticipation and National Championship aspirations. That’s whats great about college football too. Each season can be drastically different. You’re not dealing with contracts and free agents. You’re dealing with boys turning in to men. A crap shoot on genetics. There is this aura of the unknown that blankets college football like Jourdan Lewis on George Rushing. Weird, right? 8 months ago I thought Michigan would never be able to cross the bottomless pit of morals that is Ohio State. I was corpse of a fan. Now? There isn’t a doubt in my mind that we run them off the field in November. Its crazy. Its wild. It cant be measured or captured. Hope.

While it is so much fun to let the mind run wild, wanna know the best part about football season? Its the ride. The ups and downs of a 12 and 16 game season. If your college loses on Saturday, maybe your favorite NFL can win on Sunday and salvage the weekend. If they both win, you cant wait until next weekend. If they both lose? Lord help you. It’s watching games that may help your team in a tie breaker down the road. Its rooting for The Citadel to put a scare into Florida to knock them down a couple spots in the polls. Think about that for a second. Not rooting for the Citadel to WIN, it would be awesome if they did, but rooting them to just keep it competitive for 75% of a football game so 12 humans in a remote location may read the narrative that your favorite team is inherently better than a different team based on nothing but perception. The texts between four different group chats that are all essentially saying the same thing, either the sky is limit or its crashing down harder than the NCAA on a student athlete who put non-approved peanut butter on his bagel. That’s a 4-game suspension! The tailgating hours and hours before a game. The copious amounts of food and beer consumed while telling war stories about the best and worst games you’ve been to in person. Giving a complete stranger a hug like you’re seeing a long lost sibling for the first time in years simply because a man, who gets paid more in a year than you’ll ever make,  kicked an oblong ball through two poles from 126 feet away as an arbitrary amount of time ticks off a digital display. The best part about football is everything about football. Will both of my favorite teams season end short of where I want them to? Probably not. But, hot damn, am I gonna have a good time along the way. 

Lions Preseason Preview

BY: DALTON

Its that time of year again. The heat is starting to break, the kids are back at school, and football is on the horizon. Lions football is back, officially tonight, as they take on the Patriots in their first sanctioned game in about six months. There has been quite a bit of change in the Lions organization this past off-season and I dont want to write a preview for every single preseason game, so here are the top three things that I am going to look for this whole preseason.

  1. Darrell Bevell’s Offense

This is the first time we will get to see what Bevell really looks like calling plays. Obviously we wont be able to see the full playbook during exhibitions, nor should we, but hopefully we will see something that resembles those championship Seattle teams. Pounding the rock then stretching the field on early downs with play action. Again, I expect the play calling to be very vanilla but we should still see the changes in the offensive foundation

2. Who Plays

Its no secret that the Lions are protective of their players in the preseason (Stafford only playing 24 snaps last preseason). But, considering how flat the team came out last year, will Patricia allow his guys to get extra live reps to be a little bit sharper? Personally, I think he will but they will run very low risk plays on offense. Defensively, is a little different. They are pretty banged up on the line right now and chemistry is a pretty major factor for that unit. This will probably be something they try to build during practices. This line is talented enough though to where there shouldnt be too much of a rough patch when everyone gets healthy. Health, above all, is the main thing that should be monitored during the preseason. How many teams have had their seasons derailed because of an injury in the preseason? The Lions wont be the greatest team in the world but it would be really shitty to have to punt on an entire season in August.

3. Ty Johnson

I am very high on the 6th round running back out of Maryland. He has break out speed and can be an absolute problem for opposing defenses. With Riddick gone, Kerryon Johnson is expected to take the bulk of his receptions, but dont be surprised if we see Ty Johnson take his fair share. He should get extended looks in the preseason too. Expect to see him all over the field. He should be in the back field, in the slot, returning kick/punts, or just doing anything to get live reps and showing off his speed

My Attempt at Eternal Glory

BY: DALTON

The allure of conquest has always been the bane existence of man. From the earliest days of hunters and gatherers roaming around Pangaea to Lewis and Clarke traversing across the early American West to Neil Armstrong being the first man to walk on the moon. Humans have always been pushing the limits in the search for knowledge. It is what has driven us to our greatest accomplishments. Lately though, the human race has stagnated. When was the last great human advancement? The internet? We have become complacent as the top dog on the planet and I, for one, plan on reigniting that burnt out candle of wonderment.

THE WHO: Me

Abraham Lincoln opened every speech with “Be the change you want to see in the world”. He was a great man and those are great words to live by. How can I sit back and criticize the likes of Elon Musk while I have yet to really contribute anything to the global society? It would make me a hypocrite, much like Joel Osteen or any other televangelist. I simply could not live with myself if I heard my name uttered in the same breath as the “honorable” Billy Graham. In a moment of genius, I knew what I had to do to help mankind.

 

THE WHAT: Eat two whole watermelons in one sitting

The task is quite simple. I have to eat two (2) entire seedless watermelons in one sitting. I originally was going to do just one watermelon but after walking by the watermelon bin in Meijer, I figured I could do one watermelon quite easily. No one has ever etched their name in history by taking the easy way out. How long is one sitting? I will sit down to eat the melons and will not be able to get up until they are finished or I give up. I will prep the watermelon into slices before the event. I will make sure I use the bathroom before the event. I will only count the endeavor a success if I can successfully eat both watermelons without having to get up.

 

THE WHERE: My house

Many great humans created their contributions in their own home (Edison, Bill Gates, the guy who invented A/C). I plan on doing the same. I must be comfortable. As much as I want to do this event on a stage, with the fans, and with the city, I simply cant. I’m not doing this for the fame. I am doing this for me, for all of us.

 

THE WHEN: This Saturday (7/27)

It was the first free day I had.
THE WHY: For the betterment of the human race

To my knowledge, no one has ever attempted this before. I’m not even sure a person can consume this much watermelon, but to live in the dark is worse than dying in the light. We need to keep pushing the envelope. The human race has become stagnant and I will take it upon myself to be the jump start this dead battery of a species needs.

 

Am I a hero? I wasnt put on this earth to answer that question. I will leave that up to the fans/media. I just know that whether I am successful or not, I wouldnt be able to live with myself if I didnt attempt this historically monumental feat. If you believe in a God, pray to him for me. If you dont, I just ask that you tell your family and friends you love them. Above all, please remember the where you were the day Dalton Potocki attempted to eat two whole watermelons.

 

Mount Rushmore of Cookout Sides

BY:DALTON

With the 4th of July right around the corner (tomorrow) its time to put out into the blog-sphere the Mount Rushmore of sides. I have to do a Mount Rushmore because I simply cant power rank them. Too much variability from side to side but this is just going off of my consensus. But why sides? Well, the sides at a cookout can make or break the entire event. You could have the best meats in the world but if that potato salad is shit, you’re going to have an awful time. On the reverse though, if the meats are bad but sides are good, you can fill up on sides no problem. There have been many times where I’ve went through the food line once, finished my plate, then went back for only sides. Don’t get me wrong, you cant have a cook out without meats. Cant do it, but the sides are a huge factor. I would say a good cookout is weighed out 50% meats, 40% sides, and 10% drinks. That being said, here’s the Mount Rushmore of cook out sides:

 

POTATO SALAD: An absolute staple. I really dont care about the type of potato salad either. It could be Amish, loaded, redskin, american, mustard-based, or mayo-based. It will always have a spot on my flimsy paper plate and in my heart.

MACARONI SALAD: Similar to the potato salad, it really doesnt matter what variation of this salad is out there as long as it stays loyal to its roots. Macaroni salad can be deep, flavorful, and light all at the same time. If you can get a mayo-based macaroni salad and pair it with a mustard-based potato salad, you may as well be in Heaven.

COLESLAW: This one could take some heat because I know a decent contingent of people, some I would even call friends, that dont like coleslaw. I feel I speak for the sane Americans when I say it is a top tier side. Again, doesnt matter to me if its mayo-based or vinegar-based. I like it all. You can also get a little CRaZy with it and put the slaw on your burger.

CORN (ON THE COB): Any corn here is fine, but on the cob is the most dominant form. Throw some butter on there and youre cooking with absolute gas. The sweeter and juicier the better.  Pro tip: Sprinkle a little garlic salt on the corn after the butter. You wont regret it!

TOUGHEST CUTS: Baked Beans, Watermelon, Grapes, Grilled Veggies

Pistons Get High (Value), Start Euro-Tripping

BY: DALTON

I cant tell if I’m just not caring as much as I get older or what, but the reaction to the Pistons 1st round pick seemed exactly like the Lions 2nd round pick in their respective draft. A resounding “who?”. For the Lions it was a Hawaiian linebacker and for the Pistons its a French swing-man. Sekou Doumbouya is the newest Detroit Piston and after staring at my TV for 2 minutes trying to figure out how to pronounce his name, Twitter came through and told me that this was a really good pick. Obviously it wasn’t universal praise, you cant please everyone. Here was the positive line of thinking: It was a good pick because he is a top 10 talent, he is raw but should develop into something. The negative line of thinking was: He might bust and if he doesn’t, his window doesn’t fit with Blake and Andre’s.

I am not here to tell you how to think. If I were, they would call me the Emperor of Thought. Alas, all you simpletons have to form your own dumb ideas. But MY thoughts on it are on the positive side. Many analysts pegged him as a lottery talent and the Pistons themselves even said that they were surprised that Sekou was there at 15. Do I think that his timeline matches up with the current Piston’s core? No. Now, that’s not to say he takes some early jumps and become a legit player within a year or two. But, I do think he is athletic enough to help right away. I like that the front office was able to take one of the best players available, address a team need (wing length+depth), and still kept an eye towards the future. I do think Sekou can be a top 50 player in the league. He has the body, the athleticism, and, from all accounts, the drive to want to get better. For player comparisons, I would say his high side is Pascal Siakam and his low side is Stanley Johnson.

The Pistons also traded some picks and got another Euro, Deividas Sirvydis, then drafted former Tennessee point guard Jordan Bone. Deividas sounds like he is going to stay in Europe for another year to develop. The jury is still out, for me, on this pick. If he can come over and be a legitimate shooter, then its a hell of a pick. As for Bone, he was the 57th pick in the draft. If he can contribute at all in the NBA its a win.

DRAFT GRADES:

Sekou Doumbouya: B+

Deividas Sirvydis: N/A

Jordan Bone: B-

 

Obviously I am going to include highlight reels:

Thursday Twitter Top Ten

BY: DALTON

Hey everyone, I realize the blog has been light so I am just going to do a weekly Twitter ranking. These are the ten best tweets from the last week.

 

10. Mature Franklin

 

9. Our Respectful King

The man is on an absolute missile to the moon. He is blowing up everywhere. He is being added to all types of movies, video games, you name it and hes in it. Also, is a HUGE respecter of women. Wont ever catch MY PRESIDENT slipping.

 

8. Klay Star

I don’t have many rules I live by, but one of them is to always retweet the Klay Thompson x Patrick Star cross over pic. Death, Taxes, Klay Star Retweets.

 

7. Ford Steering Wheel Recall

To understand why this tweet is great, watch this:

 

6. Anne Frank’s Diary

They do say that narratives are everything.

 

5. Bravery

Power Ranking the bravest people in the world: 1. People who manually control CBs in a video game 2. Random cameramen around Richie Incognito 3. Troops 4. People who went into the largest nuclear radiation disaster in history to save millions of innocent lives/this planet

 

4. Hotel Charging

Show me one hotel this doesn’t apply to, I’ll wait.

 

3. Trump and Mars

Started with Trump saying that we should never go to the Moon because we’ve already been there, then he lumped in the Moon and Mars, then just perfect execution of reference and gif out of my brother. This is why Twitter was invented.

 

2. Defensive Backfields

Not only is this tweet the pure truth, the video is moving in to automatic retweet territory. Absolutely love these goofs and their kind-of-good-kind-of-bad dance moves.

 

  1. Chernobyl

 

 

Its been a phenomenal week for tweets involving Chernobyl. We already saw a mention in the bravery section. Its cross regional in these rankings. But the three tweets above are the tip of the top, the creme of the crop for the week. The weed is worse than nuclear radiation tweet had me dying, figuratively. I still get a chuckle out of Alex Berenson thinking he had the tweet that would finally end the use of marijuana. He thought he nailed it. This was the death shot, mic drop, and bomb (pun intended) to put to bed all this weed smoking tom foolery. Then the other two tweets about the Instagram influencers going there to take pictures is a perfect display of how these people lack self awareness. The one thing I love more than the internet is when the internet makes fun of the internet. That chick barely had on any clothes in the most nuclear-ly polluted place on the planet lmao.  Just go look at some of the replies as a great way to waste time and get a chuckle.